Home

THE HOPLITE SHIELDS

7 Comments

vase painti
A  vase  painting  depicting  a  hoplite,  5th  century  BC.  He  is  armed  with  a  bronze  cuirass,  a  hoplite  sword  and  a  hoplite  shield  of  the  Argive  type.  In  the  interior  of  the  hoplite  shield, you  can  see  the  “antilave” («αντιλαβή»,  handle/handgrip),  the  “porpax” («πόρπαξ»,  fastener  for  the  elbow)  and  the  “telamons” («τελαμώνες»,  shoulder  belts)/ (Paris,  Louvre  Museum)

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.
The  Geometric  Period  (11th-8th  centuries  BC)  preceded  the  invention  of  the  hoplite  warfare  and  the  hoplite  phalanx (about  700  BC).  The  shields  of  the  Geometric  period  belonged  to  two  main  types:  the  “Dipylon” type  shield  and  the  “Herzsprung”  type.  The  Dipylon  shield  is  named  after  the  Athenian  Dipylon  gate,  where  a  number  of  pottery  with  depictions  of  that  type  of  shield,  was  discovered.  It  was  a  large  and  long  shield,  covering  the  warrior  from  chin  to  knees.  It  was  made  of  wicker  and  leather,  without  excluding  further  strengthening  of  wooden  parts.  Despite  its  size,  the  Dipylon  shield  was  light  due  to  its  materials.  It  had  a  curved  form  in  order  to  embrace  the  warrior’s  body.  In  the  middle  of  its  surface,  the  Dipylon  shield  had  two  semicircular  notches  for  the  easier  handling  of  the  offensive  weapons (spear  or  sword).  Notches  also  facilitated  the  hanging (suspension)  of  the  Dipylon  shield  on  the  warrior’s  back,  in  order  not  to  restrict  his  elbows  when  he  walked.  The  shield  had  at  least  one  central  handle  for  its  holding  by  the  warrior  in  battle,  and  one  or  more  shoulder  belts,  in  order  to  hang  it  on  his  back  when  not  used.  These  belts  were  called  “telamones” (τελαμώνες).  The  shape  of  the  Dipylon  shield  denotes  its  origins  from  the  famous  Minoan  and  Mycenaean  eight-shaped  shield.  During  the  Greek  Archaic  Era (7th cent – 479  BC),  the  Dipylon  shield  was  made  mostly  of  bronze  and  had  a  smaller  size:  that  is  the  “Boeotian”  type  of  shield,  named  after  Boeotia,  where  it  was  popular.

Continue reading

LEONIDAS’ LUCKLESS BROTHER: DORIEUS THE SPARTAN

Leave a comment

Greek Phoenician colonizationBy  Periklis    Deligiannis

.

By  the  end  of  the  sixth  century  BC,  Anaxandridas  of  the  Agiad  royal  family,  one  of  the  two  Spartan kings (Sparta  had  two  kings),  had  a  difficulty  in  bearing  children  from  his  first  wife.  The  Spartan  ephors  forced  him  to  take  a  second  wife – despite  the  southern  Greek  monogamy – in  order  to  obtain  a  successor.  Anaxandridas’  second  wife  gave  birth  to  Cleomenes,  who  was  destined  to  become  one  of  the  most  skilful  Spartan  kings.  However,  shortly  after  the  birth  of  Cleomenes,  Anaxandridas’  first  wife  also  gave  birth  to  a  son,  named  Dorieus.  Although  Dorieus  came  from  the  king’s  first  wife,  Cleomenes  succeeded  Anaxandridas  to  the  throne  as  firstborn.  Dorieus  became  furious  because  of  the  takeover  of  royal  power  by  Cleomenes.  Thus  he  decided  to  organize  a  colonization  campaign,  in  order  to  leave  forever  Sparta  (515  BC).  His  first  choice  for  the  founding  of  his  colony,  was  the  site  of  the  river  Kinyps  in  Libya.  The  men  who  followed  him  out  were  referred  by  the  sources  as  “Lacedaemonians”  and  it  seems  that  they  included  a  few  real  Spartans  (Spartan  citizens,  called  omoioi).  The  Spartan  omoioi  followers  of  Dorieus  were  mainly  his  personal  friends  and  some  members  of  his  political  faction.  The  majority  were  other  Lacedaemonians,  mainly  hypomeiones  (fallen  citizens,  ex-Spartans  who  were  just  beginning  to  become  numerous),  perioikoi (free  Lakonian, Messenian  and  Pylian  subjects  of  Sparta)  and  Peloponnesian  allies.

More

THE OTHER MARATHON: THE DECISIVE VICTORY OF ATHENS ON THE DORIANS (circa 1000 BC)

1 Comment

 By  Periklis    DeligiannisFile written by Adobe Photoshop¨ 4.0

A  depiction  of  combatants  in  the  so-called  “Vase  of  the  Warriors”  of    the  Later  Mycenean  or  the  Sub-Mycenaean  period.  It  seems  that  the  fully  equipped  Attic/Athenian  warriors  and  their  Dorian  opponents  were  armed  like  the  depicted  ones.

.

attica1

During  the  first  half  of  the  2nd  millennium  BC,  Attica  was  divided  into  several  independent  communities/states.  Athens  (whose  urban  limits  were  limited  at  the  Acropolis  in  this  period)  was  one  of  the  strongest  Attic  city-states,  probably  ruled  by  a  Danaan  dynasty.  Its  key  location  almost  in  the  middle  of  the  distance  from  Ereneia  to  Sounion  (extreme  border  towns  of  Attica  to  the  northwest  and  southeast  respectively),  its  relatively  fertile  land  that  surrounded  it  and  the  inaccessible  site  of  the  Acropolis,  were  some  parameters  that  gave  Athens  an  edge  over  the  other  competing  communities-states  for  the  domination  of  Attica,  mainly  over  the  states  of  Eleusis  and  Pallene.  Athens  was  the  final  winner  in  the  intra-Attic  struggle.
More

THE PRO-PERSIAN ROLE OF THEBES & BOEOTIA IN THE PERSIAN WARS: MYTH AND REALITY

1 Comment

By  Periklis    Deligiannisa2

Ancient Boeotia  and  its  city-states.

Many  modern  scholars  and  historians  (with  prominent  the  Canadian  historian  Back)  believe  that  the  pro-Persian  policy  (calling  “medizing”  in  ancient  Greece) of  Thebes  and  most  cities  of  the  rest  of  Boeotia  during  the  2nd  Persian  war  (480-479  BC),  was  not  as  extensive  as  the  ancient  historian  Herodotus (the  main  source  for  the  Greek-Persian  wars)  tried  to  indicate.  It  is  evident  from  the  writings  of  Herodotus,  that  he  discriminated  in  favor  of  Athens  and  Sparta  (and  against  their  rival  city-states  of  Thebes,  Argos  etc.).  It  is  recognized  that  the  pro-Persian  policy  of  Macedonia,  Thessaly  and  Argos  (other  Greek  states  also  “blamed”  for  “medizing”  at  the  same  time)  was  not  really  extensive.  The  Boeotian  city-states  (mainly  Thebes)  bear  the  “burden”  of  the  blame  of  “medizing” , because  of  Herodotus. The  ancient  historian  probably  distorted  the  historical  truth  by  noting  inordinately   their  pro-Persian  policy,  which  was  not  more  intense  than  that  of  the  aforementioned  states.  It  is  true  that  the  Thebans  and  the  Boeotians  desired  a  Persian  victory,  only  because  of  their  hostility  to  their  neighboring  Athenians.  So  they  possibly  did  not  join  the  Greek  Alliance,  because  its  leaders  were  the  city-states  of  Athens  and  Sparta.  Argos  did  the  same  because  of  its  hostility  to  Sparta.

b
A  beautiful  original  Boeotian  helmet.  This  type  was  originally  used  by  the  Boeotian  infantry  and  cavalry,  but  later  it  became  popular  to  all  the  Greek  cavalrymen  ( comitatus.net).

Continue reading

THE UNKNOWN HISTORY OF THE ATTIC/ATHENIAN HELMET

Leave a comment

By  Periklis    Deligiannis
The  standard  type of  Attic/Athenian  helmet  of  the  Roman  officers.

The  Attic  or  Athenian  helmet  was  an  invention  of  the  ancient  Athenians,  derived  from  a  transformation  of  the  older  Chalkidean  casque  (or  Chalkidian).  The  History  of  the  Attic  helmet  spans  to  more  than  a  thousand  years  and  belongs  paradoxically,  more  to  the  Italian-Roman  rather  than  the  Greek  arsenal.
The  ancestral  Chalkidean  helmet  (6th  century  BC)  was  a  “lighter”  type  of  the  even  older  and  famous  Corinthian  or  Dorian  helmet (the  typical  helmet  of  the  Classical  Spartans).  The  Chalkidean  helmet  came  from  the  attempt  of  the  Chalkideans  to  solve  the  problem  of  the  limited  vision  and  hearing  of  the  hoplite,  because  of   his  Corinthian  helmet.  The  Chalkideans  were  the  people  of  the  city-state   Chalkis  in  the  island  Euboea, famous  for  its  weaponry  during  the  Archaic  Era (7th cent. – 479  BC).  It  seems  that  the  Chalkidean  helmet  was  popular  in  Athens  and  Attica,  as  we  can  see  in the  Athenian  vase-paintings.  This  preference  might  be  due  partly  to  the  Ionic  ethnological  affinities  of  the  Athenians  and  Euboeans.
Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: