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Magnificent Japanese weaponry (part II)

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A modern Japanese practising mounted archery, a military tradition closely related to Samurai warfare.

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CONTINUED FROM PART  I

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Magnificent Japanese weaponry (part I)

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Some more Samurai arms and armour mostly of the Muromachi (Ashikaga) and Edo eras. The legendary warriors of Japan coupled the local military tradition of their islands with the influences of the nearby continent, to produce an isolated but salutary enough military culture, a rare phenomenon in World History.

Wikimedia Commons is the source of most of the images of these two posts.

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Japanese arms and armour of the Muromachi and Edo era (part II)

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Japanese arms and armour of the Muromachi and Edo era (part I)

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In this collection of images I chose to present arms and armour of Japan mostly of the Muromachi (Ashikaga) and Edo periods, and also some from later historical eras, which are typical and non-typical as well. That is why I do not present the renowned Japanese swords nor do I insist so much on presenting other well-known items of the Samurai weaponry on which a disproportionally great deal of attention has been given.  I chose to present a more generic variety of Japanese traditional weaponry. The following images include helmets, quivers, spears, horse chanfrons, battle-axes, early pistols, a variety of armours and other military items.

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The emperor’s armour: Bronze statue of Hadrian from the legionary camp at Tel Shalem (Judaea), Israel Museum

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Republication from Following Hadrian

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A magnificent bronze statue of Hadrian, now on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, was found by chance by an American tourist in Tel Shalem (Beth Shean Valley, Israel) on 25th July 1975 while searching for ancient coins with a metal detector. Tel Shalem was once occupied by a detachment of the Sixth Roman Legion (Legio VI Ferrata). The 50 fragments of this statue were found in a building which stood at the center of the camp, perhaps in the principia (the headquarters tent or building).

Bronze statue of Hadrian, found at the Camp of the Sixth Roman Legion in Tel Shalem, 117–138 AD, Israel Museum, Jerusalem © Carole Raddato

Bronze statue of Hadrian, found at the Camp of the Sixth Roman Legion in Tel Shalem, Israel Museum, Jerusalem
© Carole Raddato

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SPOILS FROM THE SULTAN (part II): Arms and armour captured from the Turks in 1529-1683, in the Military History Museum of Vienna

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By Periklis Deligiannis
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CONTINUED FROM PART I

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Ottoman horsetail-standards (credit: Erich Lessing archive)
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