Home

The earliest modern humans outside Africa

Leave a comment

Republication from science.sciencemag.org

Earliest modern humans out of Africa

Recent paleoanthropological studies have suggested that modern humans migrated from Africa as early as the beginning of the Late Pleistocene, 120,000 years ago. Hershkovitz et al. now suggest that early modern humans were already present outside of Africa more than 55,000 years earlier (see the Perspective by Stringer and Galway-Witham). During excavations of sediments at Mount Carmel, Israel, they found a fossil of a mouth part, a left hemimaxilla, with almost complete dentition.

The sediments contain a series of well-defined hearths and a rich stone-based industry, as well as abundant animal remains. Analysis of the human remains, and dating of the site and the fossil itself, indicate a likely age of at least 177,000 years for the fossil—making it the oldest member of the Homo sapiens clade found outside Africa.

Science, this issue p. 456; see also p. 389

 

More

Mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroup L3 basic lineages migrated back to Africa from Asia around 70,000 years ago

Leave a comment

Republication from biorxiv

Abstract

Background: After three decades of mtDNA studies on human evolution the only incontrovertible main result is the African origin of all extant modern humans. In addition, a southern coastal route has been relentlessly imposed to explain the Eurasian colonization of these African pioneers. Based on the age of macrohaplogroup L3, from which all maternal Eurasian and the majority of African lineages originated, that out-of-Africa event has been dated around 60-70 kya. On the opposite side, we have proposed a northern route through Central Asia across the Levant for that expansion. Consistent with the fossil record, we have dated it around 125 kya. To help bridge differences between the molecular and fossil record ages, in this article we assess the possibility that mtDNA macrohaplogroup L3 matured in Eurasia and returned to Africa as basic L3 lineages around 70 kya.

More

Admixture into and within sub-Saharan Africa

Leave a comment

Republication  from elifesciences.org

 

Similarity between two individuals in the combination of genetic markers along their chromosomes indicates shared ancestry and can be used to identify historical connections between different population groups due to admixture. We use a genome-wide, haplotype-based, analysis to characterise the structure of genetic diversity and gene-flow in a collection of 48 sub-Saharan African groups. We show that coastal populations experienced an influx of Eurasian haplotypes over the last 7000 years, and that Eastern and Southern Niger-Congo speaking groups share ancestry with Central West Africans as a result of recent population expansions.

More

A set of arms and armour from Sudan: the influence of Mamluk Egypt on the military equipment of the African hinterland

Leave a comment

Dear friends,

First, a briefing on the disablement of the comments:

Concerning the disablement of the comments on the posts, I had to do so due to the lack of time. Because, for me not to answer to your comments is something that I consider as inappropriate. However when it will be possible again (soon, I believe) I’ll activate the comments .

Thank you so much for your consistent preference to ‘Delving into History’.

Periklis Deligiannis

This set of arms and armour from Sudan denotes the influence of Mamluk Egypt on the military equipment of the African hinterland Muslim states: mail armour, kalkan-type shield, helmet with nose-guard, and straight sword of the 16th or the 17th century from Sudan, which clearly imitate the respective arms and armour of the Mamluks (unknown museum).
In comparison, in the second image I present an Ottoman set of armour, helmet and metal shield identical to those used by the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria (unknown museum).

More

Rethinking the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa

Leave a comment

Republication from Wiley Online library

Current fossil, genetic, and archeological data indicate that Homo sapiens originated in Africa in the late Middle Pleistocene. By the end of the Late Pleistocene, our species was distributed across every continent except Antarctica, setting the foundations for the subsequent demographic and cultural changes of the Holocene. The intervening processes remain intensely debated and a key theme in hominin evolutionary studies. We review archeological, fossil, environmental, and genetic data to evaluate the current state of knowledge on the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

More

Extensive West Eurasian admixture throughout the African continent revealed

Leave a comment

Reoublication from Science mag

Characterizing genetic diversity in Africa is a crucial step for most analyses reconstructing the evolutionary history of anatomically modern humans. However, historic migrations from Eurasia into Africa have affected many contemporary populations, confounding inferences. Here, we present a 12.5x coverage ancient genome of an Ethiopian male (‘Mota’) who lived approximately 4,500 years ago. We use this genome to demonstrate that the Eurasian backflow into Africa came from a population closely related to Early Neolithic farmers, who had colonized Europe 4,000 years earlier.

More

Older Entries