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Ancient Asia Minor early 1st century BC

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A nice map in Italian of ancient Asia Minor in the early 1st century BC. Cilicia and “Asia” (that is West Asia Minor according to the ancient Greeks) are already Roman provinces. The Seleucid kingdom is no more an ’empire’. But most of all
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Sanctuary of Nereidai in Xanthos, Lycia: Architecture

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A modern representation of the Hellenistic Sanctuary of Nereidai in Xanthos, Lycia, Asia Minor.
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Assos, Hellenic city in Asia Minor: Architecture

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Architectural reconstructions of Assos, a significant Greek city of Asia Minor.

Above: the Temple of Athena in Assos.

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Post-Hittite “Little empires” in Asia Minor: Phrygia and Lydia

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These are some political maps of the Phrygian and Lydian kingdoms at their greatest extent in the 8th and 6th centuries BC respectively. These two kdms were a kind of “Little empires” of the Anatolian Iron Age that appeared some centuries after the fall of the main Bronze Age empire of Asia Minor that is the Hittite Empire (the last map). The Phrygians were actually invaders from the Balkan Peninsula, kinsmen of the Thracians, the Greeks and possibly the Homeric Trojans. In the Balkans they were known as ‘Brygae’. They were actually a group of tribes, one of which was probably the Proto-Armenians. The main body of the Phrygians settled in an area that included the old Hittite heartland. Gordion and Midas city were their capital cities, and their main sanctuary was at Pessinus.

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The Sea Peoples and the end of the Bronze Age

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Republication from newscientist.com

The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed “World War Zero” – an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago.

And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians.

By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland Greece, among others.

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