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Carnyx, the war trumpet of the Celts

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A fine reenactment of a Gallic warrior blowing a carnyx, the war trumpet of the Celts. The carnyx was a kind of trumpet used in warfare, probably to incite troops to battle and intimidate opponents, as Polybius recounts. Reenactor group uknown. Kudos to them.

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Romans vs Celts in Aquileia, Italy

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Aquileia was founded in 181 BC as a Roman colony to prevent Celtic incursions in the Italian interior. Soon the Celtic tribes of N/Eastern Alpine Italy, Pannonia and other neighbouring regions, reacted by force to this colonisation and I suppose that the image depicts a modern reenactment of the battle

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Distinctive Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology

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Republication  from the University of York

Photo credit: University of York

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A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.

The only one of its kind ever found in Europe, the shield was found south of Leicester on the Everards Meadows site, in what is believed to have been a livestock watering hole.

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Fortress of Paule, Armorica, Gaul 50 BCE

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An aerial view of the Fortress-oppidum of Paule, of the Osismii tribe in Armorica around 50 BCE at the time of the Roman conquest of Gaul. It is located in modern Saint Symphorien and it was one of the strongest fortresses of the tribe,
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Myths of British ancestry

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Republication from Prospect Journal

satellite(Image credit: Mapbox)

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Everything you know about British and Irish ancestry is wrong. Our ancestors were Basques, not Celts. The Celts were not wiped out by the Anglo-Saxons, in fact neither had much impact on the genetic stock of these islands

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The fact that the British and the Irish both live on islands gives them a misleading sense of security about their unique historical identities. But do we really know who we are, where we come from and what defines the nature of our genetic and cultural heritage? Who are and were the Scots, the Welsh, the Irish and the English? And did the English really crush a glorious Celtic heritage? Everyone has heard of Celts, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings. And most of us are familiar with the idea that the English are descended from Anglo-Saxons, who invaded eastern England after the Romans left, while most of the people in the rest of the British Isles derive from indigenous Celtic ancestors with a sprinkling of Viking blood around the fringes.Yet there is no agreement among historians or archaeologists on the meaning of the words “Celtic” or “Anglo-Saxon.” What is more, new evidence from genetic analysis (see note below) indicates that the Anglo-Saxons and Celts, to the extent that they can be defined genetically, were both small immigrant minorities. Neither group had much more impact on the British Isles gene pool than the Vikings, the Normans or, indeed, immigrants of the past 50 years.The genetic evidence shows that three quarters of our ancestors came to this corner of Europe as hunter-gatherers, between 15,000 and 7,500 years ago, after the melting of the ice caps but before the land broke away from the mainland and divided into islands. Our subsequent separation from Europe has preserved a genetic time capsule of southwestern Europe during the ice age, which we share most closely with the former ice-age refuge in the Basque country. The first settlers were unlikely to have spoken a Celtic language but possibly a tongue related to the unique Basque language.

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