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Urban Plan of Emporion (Ampurias), Iberia

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An urban plan of ancient Emporion (modern Ampurias) close to the northeastern edge of Spain.
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Urban and Fortification Plan of Cartagena de Indias (1730)

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An Urban and Fortification Plan of Cartagena de Indias (1730) in modern Colombia (Instituto de Historia y Cultura Militar, Madrid). And, yes, you must have noticed my predilection for the Spanish and Italian engineers of the Renaissance who distinguished themselves in the New World.
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Ancient Asia Minor early 1st century BC

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A nice map in Italian of ancient Asia Minor in the early 1st century BC. Cilicia and “Asia” (that is West Asia Minor according to the ancient Greeks) are already Roman provinces. The Seleucid kingdom is no more an ’empire’. But most of all
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Zopyros’s heavy gastraphetes

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Detailed diagrams of Zopyros’s heavy gastraphetes (γαστραφέτης) by E. W. Marsden: general plan, side-elevation, front-elevation. The gastraphetes was an ancient Hellenic invention that nowadays is usually described as a crossbow. But actually, unlike the Roman and medieval European crossbow which

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Palintonon (ballista) heavy catapult

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Detailed diagrams of a gigantic palintonon (παλίντονον), around 334 BC (siege of Halicarnassos), probably by E.W. Marsden. The palintonon was a Hellenic heavy catapult, mostly stone-throwing, which was constructed in various scales (from just heavy to enormous). It was invented and intensively used by the Greeks in the early or mid-4th century BCE but it was soon adopted by the Carthaginians, the Romans and other ancient states. It became a ‘beloved’ weapon for the Republican and Imperial Romans: they called it ‘ballista’, but the correct initial version was ‘ballistra’ (βαλλίστρα), also a Greek term from the verb ‘βάλλω’ that is “to shoot”.

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The Temple of Trajan on the Upper Acropolis of Pergamon

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Republication from followinghadrian.com

Today we celebrate the anniversary of the accession of Trajan to the imperial throne (28 January 98 AD). As a tribute, here is a selection of images from the Temple of Trajan at Pergamon, an ancient Greek city in Aeolis.

The Temple of Trajan (Trajaneum) was one of the most spectacular structures built on the upper acropolis of Pergamon. It is situated at the highest point of the acropolis and is the only building that is truly Roman. Its construction started around 114 AD during the reign of Trajan but was completed after his death during the rule of Hadrian. Both Emperors were worshipped here.

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