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Palintonon (ballista) heavy catapult

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Detailed diagrams of a gigantic palintonon (παλίντονον), around 334 BC (siege of Halicarnassos), probably by E.W. Marsden. The palintonon was a Hellenic heavy catapult, mostly stone-throwing, which was constructed in various scales (from just heavy to enormous). It was invented and intensively used by the Greeks in the early or mid-4th century BCE but it was soon adopted by the Carthaginians, the Romans and other ancient states. It became a ‘beloved’ weapon for the Republican and Imperial Romans: they called it ‘ballista’, but the correct initial version was ‘ballistra’ (βαλλίστρα), also a Greek term from the verb ‘βάλλω’ that is “to shoot”.

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The Temple of Trajan on the Upper Acropolis of Pergamon

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Republication from followinghadrian.com

Today we celebrate the anniversary of the accession of Trajan to the imperial throne (28 January 98 AD). As a tribute, here is a selection of images from the Temple of Trajan at Pergamon, an ancient Greek city in Aeolis.

The Temple of Trajan (Trajaneum) was one of the most spectacular structures built on the upper acropolis of Pergamon. It is situated at the highest point of the acropolis and is the only building that is truly Roman. Its construction started around 114 AD during the reign of Trajan but was completed after his death during the rule of Hadrian. Both Emperors were worshipped here.

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Constructional plan of Persepolis’ palaces area

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A constructional plan of Persepolis’ palaces area. Persepolis was one of the four capital cities of the Achaemenid Persian Empire.
Also a modern restoration of a

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Walking Hadrian’s Wall

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Republication from Following hadrian

Image credit: Carole Raddato

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By Carole Raddato

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Hadrian’s Wall has long attracted hikers and history fans and is now the heart of an 84-mile-long (135 km) National Trail through some of Britain’s most beautiful countryside. Hadrian’s Wall stretches coast to coast across northern England, from Wallsend in the east to Bowness-on-Solway on the west coast.

Three years ago, I set out to explore Hadrian’s Wall, following in Hadrian’s footsteps and of the Roman soldiers who once patrolled the empire’s frontier. Hadrian’s Wall consists not only of the visible remains of the Wall itself, but also of its associated forts, milecastles, turrets and earthworks. The sites of several Roman forts lie along the route including Segedunum at Wallsend, Chesters, Housesteads, Vindolanda and Birdoswald. Naturally, I visited all of them and I will certainly report on them in the future.

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Shaiginskoye: urban/topographical plan of a Jurchen city

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P.  Deligiannis

A rare and interesting urban and topographical plan of Shaiginskoye, a Jurchen settlement of the Middle Ages centuries in Primorye Territory of the modern Russian Federation. Shaiginskoye is a unique monument of the Jurchen people who inhabited the Primorye Territory in the Middle Ages before the coming of the Russians. It was a large town with many ramparts, residential buildings and factories.

The Jurchen were a tribal confederation of  Tungus and affiliated peoples. They were the founders of the Jin dynasty (1115–1234) in Manchuria and China proper, and the ancestors of the even more powerful Manchu people who conquered the entire Chinese area (around 1644) establishing the Qing dynasty who ruled China until 1912.

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Fortification plan of Vincennes, French fort of 14th century

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Fortification and architectural plan of Vincennes, French fort of the second half of 14th century.

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