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Walking Hadrian’s Wall

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Republication from Following hadrian

Image credit: Carole Raddato

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By Carole Raddato

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Hadrian’s Wall has long attracted hikers and history fans and is now the heart of an 84-mile-long (135 km) National Trail through some of Britain’s most beautiful countryside. Hadrian’s Wall stretches coast to coast across northern England, from Wallsend in the east to Bowness-on-Solway on the west coast.

Three years ago, I set out to explore Hadrian’s Wall, following in Hadrian’s footsteps and of the Roman soldiers who once patrolled the empire’s frontier. Hadrian’s Wall consists not only of the visible remains of the Wall itself, but also of its associated forts, milecastles, turrets and earthworks. The sites of several Roman forts lie along the route including Segedunum at Wallsend, Chesters, Housesteads, Vindolanda and Birdoswald. Naturally, I visited all of them and I will certainly report on them in the future.

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Shaiginskoye: urban/topographical plan of a Jurchen city

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P.  Deligiannis

A rare and interesting urban and topographical plan of Shaiginskoye, a Jurchen settlement of the Middle Ages centuries in Primorye Territory of the modern Russian Federation. Shaiginskoye is a unique monument of the Jurchen people who inhabited the Primorye Territory in the Middle Ages before the coming of the Russians. It was a large town with many ramparts, residential buildings and factories.

The Jurchen were a tribal confederation of  Tungus and affiliated peoples. They were the founders of the Jin dynasty (1115–1234) in Manchuria and China proper, and the ancestors of the even more powerful Manchu people who conquered the entire Chinese area (around 1644) establishing the Qing dynasty who ruled China until 1912.

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Fortification plan of Vincennes, French fort of 14th century

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Fortification and architectural plan of Vincennes, French fort of the second half of 14th century.

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Εικονικές αποκαταστάσεις αρχαίων και μεσαιωνικών ιστορικών μνημείων και άλλων κατασκευών

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Σε αυτό το post θα ασχοληθώ με τις εντυπωσιακές αρχιτεκτονικές αποκαταστάσεις αρχαίων και μεσαιωνικών πόλεων, ναών, λιμανιών, θεάτρων, οχυρώσεων κλπ., από τον J.C. Golvin, Γάλλο αρχιτέκτονα και αρχαιολόγο.
Συνιστώ ανεπιφύλακτα την ιστοσελίδα του J.C. Golvin σε πολιτικούς μηχανικούς, αρχιτέκτονες και αρχαιολόγους. Με βοήθησε

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Stone-throwing catapult of Isidoros of Abydos

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Detailed diagrams of the Hellenic stone-throwing catapult of Isidoros of Abydos, by Marsden: general plan, side-elevation, front-elevation, cross-section (through center of A, K, Λ, M and N), inside elevation of N before fitting.

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Confederate Submarine Crew Killed By Their Own Weapon

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Republication from DUKE UNIVERSITY

Drawings of the H. L. Hunley from 1900 (Wikimedia commons)

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DURHAM, N.C. — The H.L. Hunley, the first combat submarine to sink an enemy ship, also instantly killed its own eight-man crew with the powerful explosive torpedo it carried, according to new research from a Duke University Ph.D. in biomedical engineering.

The Hunley’s first and last combat mission occurred during the Civil War on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank a 1,200-ton Union warship, the USS Housatonic, outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. The Hunley delivered a blast from 135 pounds of black powder below the waterline at the stern of the Housatonic, sinking the Union ship in less than five minutes. Housatonic lost five seamen, but came to rest upright in 30 feet of water, which allowed the remaining crew to be rescued after climbing the rigging and deploying lifeboats.

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