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The road to Scandinavia’s bronze age: Trade routes, metal provenance, and mixing

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Republication from phys.org/

British-developed bronze flat-axe from Selchausdal, northwest Zealand (NM B5310, photo: Nørgaard). The 20-cm-long axe has a geometric decoration covering the surface. Low-impurity copper is alloyed with 10% Sn. Scandinavia holds the largest proportion of British type axes outside the British Isles 2000-1700 BC. Credit: Heide W. Nørgaard (2019)

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The geographic origins of the metals in Scandinavian mixed-metal artifacts reveal a crucial dependency on British and continental European trading sources during the beginnings of the Nordic Bronze Age, according to a study published July 24, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Heide W. Nørgaard from Aarhus University, Denmark, and colleagues.

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Ancient Roman port history unveiled

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Republication from LA TROBE UNIVERSITY

Researchers successfully reconstructed anthropic influences on sedimentation, including dredging and canal gates use, in the ancient harbour of Portus – a complex of harbour basins and canals that formed the hub of commerce in the capital of the Roman Empire.

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The sword of a Hispano-Muslim warlord is digitized in 3-D

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Republication from  phys.org/

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Photo Credit: Ingheritag3D

At age 90, Ali Atar, one of the main military chiefs of King Boabdil of Granada, fought to his death in the Battle of Lucena in 1483. It was there that his magnificent Nasrid sword was taken away from him, and researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and a company from Toledo have now modeled it in order to graphically document and present it on the web.

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Four ways in which Leonardo da Vinci was ahead of his time

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Republication from The Conversation

 

The prototype design of Da Vinci’s “tank”

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Leonardo da Vinci is generally recognised as one of the great figures of the Renaissance and one of the greatest ever polymaths. As the world marks the 500th anniversary of his death, it’s important to look at some of the ways in which he showed that – as well as being a painter, sculptor and engineer – he was a thinker who was way ahead of his time.

Engineering – Dr Hywel Jones

Leonardo da Vinci is renowned as much for his inventions as his works of art, studies of architecture and anatomical drawings. The documents that survive show us his ideas for a wide range of devices. They include some of the first concepts for gliders, helicopters, parachutes, diving suits, cranes, gearboxes and many types of weapons of war. Many of these may be seen in use today, having taken the best part of 400 years to become practical realities.

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Urban Plan of Emporion (Ampurias), Iberia

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An urban plan of ancient Emporion (modern Ampurias) close to the northeastern edge of Spain.
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Urban and Fortification Plan of Cartagena de Indias (1730)

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An Urban and Fortification Plan of Cartagena de Indias (1730) in modern Colombia (Instituto de Historia y Cultura Militar, Madrid). And, yes, you must have noticed my predilection for the Spanish and Italian engineers of the Renaissance who distinguished themselves in the New World.
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