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Roman cavalry re-enactment

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Α magnificent reenactment of a group of late Roman cavalrymen bearing combat and partly parade armour. Note the dragon standard of the draconarius, his elaborate greaves, the somewhat ‘familiar’ visor and helmet of the “lancer” on the left,

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Römischer Schienenpanzer in Kalkriese – neuer Fund auf dem Schlachtfeld

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Von  kalkriese-varusschlacht.de

Illustration: Roland Warzecha

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Wissenschaftler präsentieren Jahrhundertfund

Wieder einmal ist den Archäologen am Ort der Varusschlacht in Kalkriese eine sensationelle Entdeckung gelungen. Gefunden wurde ein römischer Schienenpanzer. Er ist annähernd vollständig und datiert in die Zeit um Christi Geburt. Der Kalkrieser Schienenpanzer ist somit das am besten erhaltene und derzeit älteste bekannte Exemplar dieses Rüstungstyps in der römischen Welt.

Schienenpanzer schützten den Oberkörper der römischen Soldaten. Sie bestanden aus Metallplatten und Schienen, die sich durch Scharniere und Lederriemen miteinander verbinden und dem Träger individuell anpassen ließen. More

Ancient Roman port history unveiled

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Republication from LA TROBE UNIVERSITY

Researchers successfully reconstructed anthropic influences on sedimentation, including dredging and canal gates use, in the ancient harbour of Portus – a complex of harbour basins and canals that formed the hub of commerce in the capital of the Roman Empire.

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Urban Plan of Emporion (Ampurias), Iberia

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An urban plan of ancient Emporion (modern Ampurias) close to the northeastern edge of Spain.
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25 August AD 117– The announcement of Hadrian’s accession in Alexandria (#Hadrian1900)

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Republication from  followinghadrian.com,

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One thousand nine hundred years ago on this day, only two weeks after Hadrian’s proclamation in Antioch, the new prefect of Egypt (Praefectus Aegypi), Quintus Rammius Martialis, addressed a circular letter to the strategoi of the Egyptian districts (nomes) announcing the imperial accession of Hadrian and instructing them to declare festivities for ten days.

The document, written in Greek, has been preserved on papyrus (POxy 55.3781). It comes from the Oxyrhynchus Papyri Collection which comprises the papyrus texts excavated by two young Oxford scholars, Bernard Grenfell and Arthur Hunt, in the rubbish dumps outside the Graeco-Egyptian town of Oxyrhynchus in central Egypt in the late 19th and early 20th century. The manuscripts, dating from the 3rd century BC to the 7th century AD, include texts with information about the daily life and the economic affairs of the town as well as a large collection of literary works in Greek and a few in Latin. They were then brought to England and deposited in Oxford. The Egypt Exploration Society owns more than 500,000 papyrus fragments from this site which are now housed in the Sackler Library in Oxford. It is the biggest hoard of classical manuscripts in the world. After more than 100 years since their discovery, the Oxyrhynchus Papyri continue to be reconstructed from fragments and translated at Oxford University.

 Location of Oxyrhynchos in Egypt.
By NordNordWest (Oxyrhynchos map.gif by Yomangani) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

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