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China’s Great Flood and the Xia dynasty

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Republication from science.sciencemag.org

China’s historiographical traditions tell of the successful control of a Great Flood leading to the establishment of the Xia dynasty and the beginning of civilization. However, the historicity of the flood and Xia remain controversial. Here, we reconstruct an earthquake-induced landslide dam outburst flood on the Yellow River about 1920 BCE that ranks as one of the largest freshwater floods of the Holocene and could account for the Great Flood.

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Acropolis of Athens: Architecture, part II

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Modern reconstruction of the Hellenistic loggia (peristyle) of Eumenes at Acropolis’ south incline.

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The Great Migration and African-American genes

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Republication from plos.org

 

We present a comprehensive assessment of genomic diversity in the African-American population by studying three genotyped cohorts comprising 3,726 African-Americans from across the United States that provide a representative description of the population across all US states and socioeconomic status. An estimated 82.1% of ancestors to African-Americans lived in Africa prior to the advent of transatlantic travel, 16.7% in Europe, and 1.2% in the Americas, with increased African ancestry in the southern United States compared to the North and West. Combining demographic models of ancestry and those of relatedness suggests that admixture occurred predominantly in the South prior to the Civil War and that ancestry-biased migration is responsible for regional differences in ancestry. We find that recent migrations also caused a strong increase in genetic relatedness among geographically distant African-Americans. Long-range relatedness among African-Americans and between African-Americans and European-Americans thus track north- and west-bound migration routes followed during the Great Migration of the twentieth century. By contrast, short-range relatedness patterns suggest comparable mobility of ∼15–16km per generation for African-Americans and European-Americans, as estimated using a novel analytical model of isolation-by-distance.

 

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London’s Viking Lineage

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Republication from  heritagedaily.com

London is generally associated with the Romans, Saxons and Normans, but a lesser known part of London’s history is intertwined with that of the Vikings.

When the early Anglo-Saxons settled in the area, they established a settlement that later become known as Ludenwic. This settlement was sited 1.6 km’s from the ruins of Londinium, the Roman city (Named Lundenburh in Anglo-Saxon, to mean “London Fort”).

By around 600, Anglo Saxon England was divided into several small kingdoms known as the Heptarchy. Lundenwic came under control of the Mercian Kingdom in about 670, as the Kingdom of Essex became gradually reduced in size and status. After the death of Offa of Mercia in 796, it was later disputed between Mercia and Wessex.

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Η Επανάσταση του ’21 και η αναγνώριση της Ελλάδας από την Αϊτή (1822)

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Αναδημοσίευση από Αργολική Αρχειακή Βιβλιοθήκη Ιστορίας & Πολιτισμού

 

Ζαν Πιερ Μπουαγιέ

Η Επανάσταση του ’21 και η αναγνώριση της Ελλάδας από την Αϊτή (1822)


Η Αϊτή υπήρξε η πρώτη χώρα στον κόσμο που αναγνώρισε την Ελληνική Επανάσταση και την Ελλάδα ως ανεξάρτητο κράτος. Το 1822, ο πρόεδρος της Αϊτής, Ζαν Πιερ Μπουαγιέ (JeanPierreBoyer), απέστειλε στην Ελληνική Επιτροπή των Παρισίων και τα μέλη του «διευθυντηρίου» της, Αδαμάντιο Κοραή, Κ. Πολυχρονιάδη, Α. Βογορίδη και Χρ. Κλωνάρη, επιστολή, με την οποία η χώρα της Καραϊβικής αναγνώριζε τότε την ανεξάρτητη Ελλάδα.

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Acropolis of Athens: Architecture, part I

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Modern reconstruction of the Ionian style temple of Athena Nike in the Acropolis.
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