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Distinctive Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology

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Republication  from the University of York

Photo credit: University of York

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A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.

The only one of its kind ever found in Europe, the shield was found south of Leicester on the Everards Meadows site, in what is believed to have been a livestock watering hole.

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Legio VI in action

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A superb reenactment photo by D.Freschet, of the Legio VI reenactment group (Bellegarde 2011) (credit: Legio VI/ D.Freschet). Unfortunately I do not know the exact  name of the group. All I know is that they’ve made an excellent work.

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Palintonon (ballista) heavy catapult

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Detailed diagrams of a gigantic palintonon (παλίντονον), around 334 BC (siege of Halicarnassos), probably by E.W. Marsden. The palintonon was a Hellenic heavy catapult, mostly stone-throwing, which was constructed in various scales (from just heavy to enormous). It was invented and intensively used by the Greeks in the early or mid-4th century BCE but it was soon adopted by the Carthaginians, the Romans and other ancient states. It became a ‘beloved’ weapon for the Republican and Imperial Romans: they called it ‘ballista’, but the correct initial version was ‘ballistra’ (βαλλίστρα), also a Greek term from the verb ‘βάλλω’ that is “to shoot”.

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Camouflage technique from the past could have benefits in Today’s Warfare

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Republication from heritagedaily

Spartan APC Dazzle Camoflage

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Using the history of the past could help save lives in todays conflict.  Painting army vehicles with high contrast geometric patterns – ‘dazzle camouflage’ –  derived from past wars affects the perception of their speed and thus could make them less susceptible to rocket propelled grenade attacks, according to new research from the University of Bristol.

Warships in both the First and Second World Wars were painted with dazzle camouflage: startling geometric patterns aimed at confusing the enemy rather than concealing the vessel.  It was thought that such patterning would disrupt the enemy’s perception of a ship’s range, heading, size, shape and speed, thus reducing losses from torpedo attacks by submarines.  While there were good reasons to believe that these perceptual distortions occurred, the effectiveness of dazzle camouflage was never scientifically proven.

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Architectural details of ancient Hellenic temples

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Some digital images on architectural details of ancient Hellenic temples. The first image depicts a corner peristylion, the second image depicts a coloured gate and the last one a detail of the southwest wing buildings of the Acropolis of Athens.

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Assos, Hellenic city in Asia Minor: Architecture

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Architectural reconstructions of Assos, a significant Greek city of Asia Minor.

Above: the Temple of Athena in Assos.

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