Home

ARMOUR OF THE SPARTANS and other Lacedaemonians

3 Comments

Metropolitan museum of art
The typical Greek muscled thorax of Late Classical and Hellenistic age. This one belongs to the 4th century BC. Following the battle of Leuctra (371 BC) the Spartan and the other hoplite armies introduced its use more  imperatively  (Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo by ‘Emiliano Zapata’).

.

By  Periklis  Deligiannis
.
The Geometric bell-type cuirass was the main type of armor of the Greek hoplite during the Archaic age (700-479 BC) and was the most popular among the Spartans of this era. At the end of the 6th century BC, the hoplites bearing bronze armour adapted to this a row of metal, leather or linen protective strips (called pteruges, i.e. wings) and later a double row, thus complementing the protection of the lower part of their body. At the same time, there was a massive shift of preference of the Greek hoplites to the linothorax (λινοθώραξ), that is the linen cuirass, and secondarily to the leather one. In the 5th century BC the linen cuirass largely supplanted the leather one and limited the use of the metal armour, thereby becoming the most popular Greek thorax. The linen and leather thoraxes were not used to any significant extent by the Spartans, however it seems that they were the prevailing ones in the other categories of Lacedaemonians (the other free inhabitants of the Spartan/Lacedaemonian state, except the Spartans). The Greek cuirasses made of flexible materials could be partially covered with bronze scales or plates that were stitched to the linen or leather base. These variations do not seem to be ever used by the Spartan or generally the Lacedaemonian hoplites.

Following the Greco-Persian Wars, the engraved depiction of the male anatomy of the Archaic bell-type bronze armor became sculpted, evolving to the new muscled or anatomical type. At the same time, its bell-type end was extended gradually downwards covering the abdomen and groins, thus substituting the Archaic protective bronze plate of this area, called ‘mitra(μίτρα). In the final form of the anatomical armor, the male muscles are depicted accurately on its surface. Simultaneously, the protection of the lower part of the torso was achieved by two rows of leather or linen strips (but not longer brazen ones). The muscled bronze cuirass was the one that prevailed overwhelmingly among the Spartan omoioi (full citizens, the elite force of the Spartan/Lacedaemonian army). It was an expensive armor, but it was the dominant among the Spartan hoplites because essentially the only luxury that they were allowed by the state was the expensive military equipment.

More

TO BE A SPARTAN – PART II

5 Comments

By  Periklis  Deligiannis1

The  river  Eurotas,  near  Sparta.

CONTINUED  FROM  PART  I

On  the  other  hand,  the  Spartan  society  was  not  so  rigid  and  robust  as  it  has  been  considered  by  most  of  the  modern  scholars.  When  not  exercising  in  the  art  of  war,  a  Spartan  used  to  entertain  himself  with  convivialitieshimself d in  the  art  of  warholars,  dances,  singing,  hunting,  participating  in  festivals  and  conversations in  the market place (Agora).  Men  who  faced  more  than  anyone  else  the  cruel  face  of  battle,  knew  as  well  how  to  enjoy  life.  The  citizens  of  Sparta  rejected  only  the  material  goods  and  comforts  which  they  considered  as  corrupters  of  men  and  women.  Although  they  were  actually  wealthy  landowners,  their  way  of  living  was  leaner  and  poorer  than  that  of  an  average  Greek  citizen  of  any  other  Greek  state.
Woe  to  any  Spartan  who  demonstrated  to  his  comrades  even  suspicion  of  cowardice  in  battle.  And  more  to  the  one  who  would  give  ground  in  battle,  even  if  he  wanted  to  avoid  a  useless  death  that  would  not  have  any  significant  benefit  for  the  state.  In  the  rest  of  his  life  he  would  face  any  kind  of  discriminations,  political,  social  and  personal,  that  they  often  reached  or  exceeded  the  limits  of  humiliation.  It  was  the  expression  par  excellence  of  the  cruelness  of  the  Spartan  society,  which  could  not  forgive  the  offense  of  undershooting  the  basic  rule  of  the  city.  The  tresas (i.e.  the  one  who  trembles  because  of  fear)  as  they  used  to  call  satirically  the  one  who  demonstrated  this  behavior,  was  facing  the  life-time  contempt  of  his  fellow  citizens.  Their  poisonous  teasing  and  the  social  isolation  accompanied  him  everywhere.  He  was  obliged  by  the  law  to  wear  clothes  with  colored  linen  pieces  sewn  to  them  and  to  always  have  shaven  half  his  beard  (as  a  half-man  because  of  cowardice).  Every  citizen  had  the  right  to  beat  him  with  impunity  and  no  one  wanted  to  marry  his  daughter  to  him.  This  celibacy  of  the  tresas  brought  about  to  him  also  a  fine  by  the  state,  because  he  deprived  it  of  new  warriors (his  children  who  would  not  be  born).  Additionally  he  was  loosing  his  civil  rights  and  his  farm,  with  whatever  this  entailed  in  terms  of  survival.  He  was  excluded  from  even  the  right  to  make  formal  legal  agreements  or  contracts.  Even  if  the  tresas  was  not  excluded  from  the  citizenry (which  occurred  from  time  to  time),  his  humiliation  did  not  stop.  His  comrades  felt  ashamed  to  have  him  in  their  syskenia (see  part  I) or  exercising  in  wrestling  with  him.  During  the  pyrrheche  (Spartan  war  dance)  they  used  to  send  him  in  the  worst  places.  When  the  tresas  met  on  the  way  his  fellow  citizens,  even  the  youngest  one,  he  had  to  step  aside  in  front  of  them.  The  spectrum  of  such  a  miserable  life  partly  explains  the  legendary  courage  of  the  Spartan  hoplite,  even  when  he  had  to  confront  the  human  ‘waves’  of  hundreds  of  thousands  of  Asiatic  warriors  in  the  battle  of  Thermopylae,  even  when  he  knew  very  well  that  death  was  inevitable.  As  mentioned,  those  who  lacked  bravery  were  relegated  to  the  class  of  the  hypomeiones.  They  were  loosing  their  civil  rights,  their  farmstead, and   they  generally  ceased  to  belong   to  the  ruling  class  of  the  state,  becoming  non-citizen  Spartans.
More

TO BE A SPARTAN: SPARTAN PSYCHOLOGY AND LIVING – PART I

3 Comments

By  Periklis  Deligiannis

11

 

Conflict  of  Greek  hoplites ( Archaic  period,  vase-painting).

RELATED  OLDER  ARTICLES:

THE SPARTAN ‘AGOGE’ (socio-military education & training) – PART I
THE SPARTAN ‘AGOGE’ (socio-military education & training) – PART II

At  the  age  of  18  years,  the  Spartan  teenager  was  becoming  an  eiren,  i.e.  an  adult  man  and  citizen.  Up  to  the  age  of  19  he  was  serving  the  state  as  proteiras,  i.e.  leader  of  a  group  of  trainees/teenagers.

The  last  stage  of  his  training  was  the  krypteia,  the  service  in  the  secret  groups  of  extermination of  threatening  helots (enslaved  serfs),  in  order  to  intimidate  the  other  helots.  The  Spartans  who  were  around  the  age  of  20  years  were  part  of  secrets  groups  patrolling  at  night  in  the  countryside.  They  were  armed  only  with  daggers  and  used  to  kill  all  the  helots  who  met  during  the  night.  Due  to  the  secrecy  of  this  activity,  during  the  day  those  young  Spartans  were  hiding  in  remote  bases  of  operations.  Sometimes  they  used  to  attack  during  the  day  as  well,  the  helots  who  were  working  in  the  fields,  killing  those  who  were  regarded  by  the  authorities  as  suspects  for  inciting  the  others  in  rebellion.  In  order  to  avoid  the  agos,  i.e.  the  curse  of  the  gods  because  of  the  murders  of  the  krypteia,  the  state  occasionally  declared  officially  the  war  on  the  helots.  Thereby  the  wars  of  Sparta  of  the  “Dark  Ages”  and  the  Geometric  Period (10th-8th  c. BC)  against  the  Achaeans  of  the  valley  of  the  Eurotas (Laconia)  and  against  the  Dorians  and  Pre-dorians  of  the  valley  of  the  Pamisos (Messenia)  who  were  the  forefathers  of  the  helots,  had  become  perpetual.  In  essence  this  ‘war’  ended  shortly  before  200  BC,  when  the  last  helots  were  freed.

For  the  Spartans,  the  killing  of  the  most  dangerous  of  their  serfs  was  not  an  unjustified  crime,  because  they  considered  the  helots  as  a  defeated  and  thus  enslaved  people  with  whom  they  were  perpetually at  war.  Therefore  they  considered  the  slain  helots  as  losses  of  the  enemy  in  this  perpetual  war,  continued  for  centuries  after  the  Spartan  conquest  of  Laconia  and  Messenia.  Until  lately  it  was  considered  that  the  krypteia  functioned  only  as  a  measure  of  national  security.  As  it  turned  out,  it  functioned  also  as  an  act  of  initiation  of  the  trainees  in  the  physical  annihilation  of  the  enemies,  a  sort  of  an  nndiation,ly  thus  enslavedos,  i.immersion  of  the  warrior  in  the  ‘first  blood’.  In  fact,  the  krypteia  was  not  continuously  taken  place  but  only  in  cases  where  there  was  a  reasonable  suspicion  about  a  revolution  of  the  helots.  If  the  krypteia  was  constantly  taken  place,  it  would  have  the  opposite  effect:  the  constant  helotic  uprisings.  The  helots  always  remained  a  tough  people  because  of  their  hard  living,  rather  than  a  ‘soft’  population  as  they  often  considered  to  be (by  a  number  of  modern  scholars).  The  Messenian  helots  were  more  threatening  because  their  lands  were  away  from  Sparta.  As  the  historian  Grundy  points  out  on  the  Messenian  helots,  ‘Sparta  was  holding  a  wolf  by  the  neck’.  The  helots  of  the  Lower  Eurotas  valley  were  also  threatening  enough.

More

THE SPARTAN ‘AGOGE’ (socio-military education & training) – PART II

1 Comment

 By  Periklis    Deligiannis

pilos

.

An  original  pilos-type  bronze  helmet,  typical  for  the  Spartans  of  the  Classical  period.

.
CONTINUED  FROM  PART  I
.
The  celebration  of  the  “gymnopaidiae”  was  particularly  important  and  it  took  place  every  year  in  Sparta,  in  the  mid-summer  (in  the  month  of  Hekatombaion,  corresponding  to  July).  The  Spartan  boys  were  preparing  for  this  celebration  that  included  sport  games  and  it  took  place  in  honor  of  the  divine  brothers  Apollo  and  Artemis  (two  of  the  main  Greek  gods),  their  mother  Leto  and  in  honor  of  Dionysus.  From  the  year  of  the  fifty-ninth  Olympiad  (544  BC),  the  celebration  of  the  gymnopaidiae  honored  (in  addition  to  these  gods)  the  fallen  hoplites  of  Sparta  who  died  in  the  so  called  “Battle  of  the  Champions”  for  conquering  Thyreatis  from  Argos.  Thyreatis  was  a  strategic  district  in  the  eastern  coast  of  the  Peloponnesus  (Thyrea  was  its  main  city).  In  time  of  war,  the  Spartans  declared  a  cessation  of  the  hostilities  during  the  celebration  of  the  gymnopaidiae.  Girls  and  adult  men  participated  as  well  in  the  feast.  During  the  dance  that  accompanied  the  feast,  the  boys  were  making  sport  exercises  which  depicted  the  sports  of  wrestling  and  ‘pagration’  (a  type  of  ancient  Greek  wrestling).  Simultaneously  they  sang  patriotic  paeans  (the  poems  of  Alcman  and  Thales)  in  honor  of  the  fallen  warriors  of  Sparta.  Plato  points  out  that  in  the  gymnopaidiae  the  boys  went  through  “hard  endurance”.  This  reference  indicates  the  level  of  hard  workout.  Modern  scholars  believe  that  the  gymnopaidiae  were  not  symbolic  but  essentially  agonistic.

The  contest  that  needed  the  greatest  mental  strength  was  that  of  the  “diamastigosis“,  i.e.  the  competition  of  strength  in  pain.  The  contestants  were  Spartan  teenager  trainees  who  were  whipped  in  front  of  watchers.  Among  them  were  the  parents  of  the  teens  who  encouraged  them  to  endure  the  horrible  pain  or  threatened  them  when  they  saw  them  close  to  failing  (Lucian).  Some  teens  left  their  last  breath  because  of  the  whipping,  falling  dead  in  front  of  the  watchers  and  their  parents  (as  Plutarch  mentions,  in  the  Life  of  Lycurgos).  These  misfortunes  were  possibly  rare  but  some  scholars  believe  the  opposite.  The  victory  in  this  ultimate  endurance  competition,  mental  and  physical,  was  extremely  honored.  The  winners  were  called  “vomonikes”  and  the  state  used  to  set  up  their  statues  in  public  places  in  order  all  the  Spartans  to  see  them  and  take  an  example  of  their  courage.
More

THE SPARTAN ‘AGOGE’ (socio-military education & training) – PART I

3 Comments

By  Periklis    Deligiannisspartan agoge

Girls  and  boys  of  Sparta  during the ‘agoge’  in  a  Western European  artwork.
.
The  Spartan  or  Laconian  ‘agoge’  (socio-military  education  and  training)  had  been  formed  at  the  end  of  the  Archaic  period  (7th  cent  –  479  BC).  The  Spartan/Lacedaemonian  tradition  claims  that  this  system  of  civic  and  military  education  was  contrived  by  the  famous  Spartan  statesman  Lycurgos.  In  fact,  Lycurgos  established  in  the  8th  century  an  early  form  of  the  agoge,  which  went  through  various  phases  of  development  and  improvement  to  get  its  final  classic  form.  The  Spartan  education  had  much  in  common  with  that  of  several  Doric/Dorian  city-states  of  Crete.  Apart  from  their  common  Doric  origins,  some  Cretan  cities  were  Spartan  colonies  and  it  is  generally  considered  that  there  was  regular  interaction  between  the  two  regions,  Laconia  and  Crete.

For  a  predominantly  militaristic  state  as  it  was  the  Spartan  state,  military  training  was  particularly  important.  If  the  young  Spartan  did  not  manage  to  go  through  its  stages,  he  could  not  enter  the  social  class  of  the  ‘omoioi’  (meaning  ‘akin’,  and  in  the  case  of  Sparta  meaning  the  ‘equals’)  who  were  the  Spartan  full  citizens,  and  he  could  not  participate  in  the  ‘Apella’,  the  Spartan  House  of  Citizens  (parliament).  Additionally,  later  in  his  life,  he  could  not  be  a  member  of  the  ‘Gerousia’  (Spartan  Senate)  and  could  not  be  elected  as  one  of  the  five  ‘Ephoroi’  (Curators).  This  extremely  hard  training  that  reached  the  limits  of  human  endurance  since  the  childhood  of  a  Spartan,  has  been  the  subject  of  criticism,  positive  and  negative,  already  from  the  ancient  times.

More

%d bloggers like this: