Home

LIBER HOMO LIBERI POPULI: DUMNORΙΧ OF THE AEDUI AGAINST CAESAR AND ROME (PART II)

1 Comment

 By  Periklis    Deligiannisvercingetorix 

Vercingetorix  (statue)  was   influenced  by  Dumnorix’s  policy  and  tragic  death.

.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.

CONTINUED FROM PART  I

In  the  subsequent  years,  Caesar  conducted  his  famous  Conquest  of  Gaul,  crashing  the  Suebi  of  Ariovistus  and  the  Belgians.  After  the  Roman  victory  over  the  Belgians,  Diviciacus,  the  main  supporter  of  the  Gallic  collaboration  with  Rome,  disappears  from  Caesar’s  narrative.  Liscus  also  disappears  from  his  narrative  but  this  is  explainable  because  he  probably  could  not  be  the  Aeduan  Vergobretus  any  more.  After  all  he  rather  gained  his  office  with  Diviciacus’  political  support  (the  latter  was  the  unofficial  leader  of  the  tribe).  Diviciacus’  disappearance  is  the  real  mystery. 

  Diviciacus  probably  did  not  believe  that  the  Gauls  could  cope  with  the  dual  military  pressure  of  the  Romans  and  the  Germans,  and  he  preferred  the  former.  Apart  from  his  decisive  diplomatic  and  counseling  assistance  to  Caesar,  he  was  the  main  founder  of  his  numerous  allied  Gallic  cavalry.  The  antithesis  of  Diviciacus  was  Dumnorix,  who  believed  in  Gallic  power  and  did  everything  for  the  freedom  of  his  people.  Dumnorix  appears  later  as  the  main  political  leader  of  the  Aedui  (and  possibly  their  Vergobretus)  when  he  was  Caesar’s  hostage.  The  most  likely  hypothesis  for  Diviciacus’  “disappearance”  in  57  BC  was  either  his  physical  death,  or  his  murder  possibly  by  Dumnorix’s  incitation.  Then  or  a  little  later,  Dumnorix  succeeded  him  in  the  unofficial  leadership  of  the  Aedui. 

  More

LIBER HOMO LIBERI POPULI: DUMNORΙΧ OF THE AEDUI AGAINST CAESAR AND ROME (PART I)

2 Comments

  Siege alesia

The  last  dramatic  episode  of  the  Roman  conquest  of  GaulVercingetorix  surrenders  to  Caesar,  in  a  classic  artwork.
.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.
During  the  period  from  122  to  52  BCthe  last  years  of  the  Gallic  independence,  the  Arverni  and  Aedui  tribes  were  competing  for  the  hegemony  in  Gaul.  In  71  BC,  the  Sequani  tribe  started  a  long  war  against  the  Aedui  who  were  pressing  them.  The  Sequani  were  in  a  disadvantageous  position  and  started  to  look  for  allies  in  the  Suebian  Germans  who  lived  on  the  east  bank  of  the  Rhine,  after  failing  to  cross  the  Oder  River  in  the  East.  Ariovistus  was  the  Suebian  warlord,  who  crossed  the  Rhine  with  thousands  of  warriors  and  managed  to  defeat  the  Aedui  in  61  BC.  The  Germans  unleashed  numerous  raids  against  many  Gallic  tribes  until  several  of  them  became  their  vassals.  The  Sequani  had  made  a  big  mistake  by  inviting  the  dangerous  Germanics  in  the  Celtic/Gallic  territory.
Diviciacus,  one  of  the  political  leaders  and  leading  Druid  of  the  Aedui,  committed  an  equally  big  mistake  when  he  asked  the  Romans  for  help  against  the  Germans.  He  traveled  to  the  “City  of  the  She-wolf”  and  was  presented  to  the  Senate  in  order  to  expose  his  request.  The  proposal  of  the  Aeduian  leader  in  the  Senate  for  an  alliance  against  Ariovistus,  met  the  objections  of  the  new  great  political  personality  of  Rome  (the  greatest  in  her  long  history  according  to  the  view  of  many  scholars),  Gaius  Julius  Caesar.  Caesar  refused  Diviciacus’  request  due  to  his  political  rivalry  with  Cicero  who  probably  supported  the  Gallic  leader  in  the  Senate.  Diviciacus  returned  to  Gaul  with  vague  promises  for  help.  Caesar,  in  order  to  reduce  Cicero  and  his  Galatian  friend,  asked  the  Senate  to  conclude  an  alliance  with  Ariovistus.  The  Senate  recognized  the  German  king  as  “Friend  of  the  Romans”,  a  move  that  emboldened  him.  Ariovistus  became  more  aggressive  in  Gaul  and  created  a  real  kingdom  in  the  conquered  Galatian  regions. 

Dumnorix,  Diviciacus’  younger  brother,  did  not  agree  with  the  pro-Roman  policy  of  his  brother.  Instead  he  aimed  in  the  union  of  all  the  Gallic  tribes,  and  believed  in  their  ability  to  repel  all  invaders  in  Gaul,  both  the  Romans  and  the  Germans.  For  this  reason  he  conducted  an  alliance  with  the  Helvetii  (Celts  who  lived  in  modern  Switzerland)  and  with  Casticus,  the  son  of  the  leader  of  the  Sequani,  who  had  disagreed  with  the  pro-German  policy  of  his  father.  Indeed,  in  order  to  strengthen  the  Celtic  alliance,  Dumnorix  married  Orgetorix’s  daughter  (the  leader  of  the  Helvetii).

More

ON THE TRIBES OF ANCIENT GAUL

2 Comments

By  Periklis    DeligiannisGalatia-Gaul[This  article is in fact a part of my book  ‘The Celts‘, Periscope publ., Athens 2008, unfortunately available only in Greek]

After  the  sharp  diminution  of  the  Celts  of  Central  Europe  by  the  Germans  (58  BC)  and  the  Romans,  Greater  Gaul,  the  country  that  lies  between  the  Rhine,  the  Alps  and  the  Pyrenees,  became  the  main  Celtic  area  in  mainland  Europe.  Gaul  (as  it  is  usually  called  for  short,  because  of  the  Romans),  Noricum,  Raetia (partly) and Northwestern Pannonia in Central Europe,  Gallaicia  (Galicia), Asturia and Cantabria  in  the  Iberian  peninsula,  and  finally  the  British  islands,  were  the  last  independent  Celtic  areas.

Shortly  before  the  Roman  conquest  of  Gaul  (or  Galatia  in  ancient  Greek)  by  Julius  Caesar,  about  sixty  tribes  shared  its  territory.  The  largest  of  these  tribes  (the  Arverni,  Aedui,  Pictones  etc.)  occupied  each  one  a  territory  of  about  15-20,000  sq.  km.,  with  a  population  of  up  to  250,000  inhabitants.  The  Celtic  tribes  were  divided  into  sub-tribes  called  pagi.  The  60  Celtic  peoples  of  Gaul  included  a  total  of  300  sub-tribes.  Many  of  these  pagi  were  originally  independent  tribes  which  were  gradually  incorporated  in  the  largest  ones,  either  by  conquest  or  by  conciliation.
The  linguists  have  estimated  that  the  tribes  of  the  Volcae,  the  Helvii  (close  relatives  of  the  Helvetii  of  modern  Switzerland),  the  Turones,  the  Nervii,  the  Suessiones,  the  Veneti,  the  Venelli  and  the  Aulerci  were  the  oldest  that  were  formed,  because  the  etymology  of  their  national  names  is  rather  difficult.  Some  of  these  tribes  were  probably  formed  initially  in  Central  Europe,  mostly  in  the  north  of  the  Alps  (the  Celtic/Gallic  cradle).  The  peoples  with  tribal  names  of  numeric  type  are  considered  to  be  later  tribal  formations,  e.g.  The  Remi  (meaning  the  ‘first  ones’  in  Gallic  Celtic),  the  Petrokorii  (the  ‘four  tribes’)  the  Vocontii  (‘twenty  clans’).  The  same  goes  for  the  tribes  whose  national  names  are  annominations  or  epithets,  e.g.  the  Ruteni  (the  ‘blonde  ones’,  a  Proto-Indo-European  verbal  type  found  today  in  the  names  of  the    Russians  and  the  Ruthenians  of  Eastern  Europe),  the  Leuci  (the  ‘bright  ones’,  like  the  Greek  ‘leucos’  meaning  the  ‘white’), the  Belgae (the ‘thunders’,  Belgians),   the  Nemetes  (the  ‘sacred’),  the  Aedui  (the  ‘fiery’),  the  Pictones  (possibly  the  ‘painted  ones’  like  the  Picts  of  Pictland/Caledonia,  modern  Scotland),  the  Caleti  (the  ‘hardened’),  the  Lemovices  or  Lemovii  (‘warriors  of  the  elm’,  which  was  their  totemic  tree)  the  Medulli  (the  ‘mead  drinkers’)  etc.

article

Celtic  warriors  in  an  impressive  artwork.  Note  the  two  naked  Gaesati/Gaesatae  warriors  in  the  frontline,  with  their  hair  stiffened  with  lime  or  lemon  juice.  Another  warrior  blows  the  ‘carnyx’,  the  Celtic  war  trumpet  (Copyright:  Zvezda  /Karatchuk  (artist)).

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: