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Single-Edged Sword, Spears & Relics discovered in ancient cemetery

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Republication from  heritagedaily.com

 

Przeworsk culture spearhead and some artifacts from the period of Roman influence, found near Bielsko-Biała (Wikimedia commons)

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Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology at the University of Kraków have made several discoveries of spearheads, clasps for fastening clothes, a richly ornamented spindle, iron needles, and a single-edged sword whilst conducting excavations of a graveyard site in Bejsce, Poland.

Researchers believe the site may be associated with the Przeworsk culture, an Iron Age society that dates from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD from central and southern Poland.

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Scientists solve the mystery of Terracotta Army weapons

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Republication from  sciencedaily.com

Photo credit: New York Times

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Source: University College London

The chrome plating on the Terracotta Army bronze weapons — once thought to be the earliest form of anti-rust technology — derives from a decorative varnish rather than a preservation technique, finds a new study co-led by UCL and Terracotta Army Museum researchers.

The study, published today in Scientific Reports, reveals that the chemical composition and characteristics of the surrounding soil, rather than chromium, may be responsible for the weapons’ famous preservation power.

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Two significant representations of ancient Greek vase-paintings and frescoes on military topics

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The sea-battle scene from the Aristonothos Vase on the left (of the reader) and on the right the “Battle in the River” fresco, along with the modern representations by Angel G. Pinto (image credit: Angel G. Pinto)

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By Periklis Deligiannis

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In this article, I would like to note two significant representations of ancient Greek paintings by one of my favourite artists on military topics, namely Angel G. Pinto. The image of the two representations came from his website (angelgpinto.blogspot.gr).

I was interested (rather lured) in the ad hoc themes that he chose for these two artistic representations, that is to say the “Battle in the River” – a Mycenaean fresco of the 13th century BC from the palace of Pylos – and the sea-battle scene from the “Aristonothos vase” of the Archaic Era (about 700-650 BC).

I will start from the chronologically earlier fresco, the “Battle in the River”. This artwork was found in the palace of Pylos, the administrative center of a Mycenaean state in the south-west Peloponnesus. It was one of the most potent states of the Mycenaean ‘Commonwealth’ and probably the best organized. Pylos was a power counterbalance to the state of Mycenae, although it seems to have been usually its ally.

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