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Admixture history and recent southern origins of Siberian populations

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Republication from BioRxiv

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siberia

Fig.1. Admixture results for K=6 showing the approximate location of the populations  included in this study. The names of the populations are coloured according to their
linguistic affiliation as follows: red = Mongolic, blue = Turkic, dark green = North
Tungusic, light green = South Tungusic (Hezhen) and Manchu (Xibo), brown = Ugric,
orange = Samoyedic, black = Yenisseic, azure = Yukaghirs, maroon = Chukotko-
Kamchatkan, pink = Eskimo-Aleut, purple = Indo-European, teal = Sino-Tibetan and
Japonic. Where two subgroups are from the same geographic location, only one of the subgroups is shown (full results are presented in Fig.S1). Note that for reasons of space the location of the two distinct Yakut subgroups does not correspond to their true location. Each color indicates a different ancestry component referred to in the text as “(light) green” or European, “yellow” or Western Siberian, “blue” or Central Siberian, “pink” or Asian,  “red” or Far Eastern, “dark green” or Eskimo.

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Irina Pugach, Rostislav Matveev, Viktor Spitsyn, Sergey Makarov, Innokentiy Novgorodov, Vladimir Osakovsky, Mark Stoneking, Brigitte Pakendorf
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TIMUR (TAMERLANE) (part IΙ)

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Turcoman-Iran mail and plate armor1450

Turcoman-Iranian mail and plate armor of rider and horse of the Timurid Era (Metropolitan Museum of Art.)
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By Periklis Deligiannis
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CONTINUED FROM PART I
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In 1386, Timur invaded the area of Luristan (in western Iran) and then defeated and expelled the Jalayrids from Tabriz, most important city of Azerbaijan. Immediately after that, his army stormed Tiflis (Tbilisi), the capital of Georgia which was also annexed to his realm, thus preventing Tokhtamysh’s expansion in southern Caucasia. In 1387 the latter reacted by invading Azerbaijan, but he was defeated by Miranshah, son of Timur who had sent him to repel the invasion.

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TIMUR (TAMERLANE) (part I)

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TimurTimur’s facial reconstruction from his skull, by Soviet anthropologists.
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By Periklis Deligiannis

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Timur, wrongly quoted in Western literature as “Tamerlane” or “Tamburlaine”, was born around 1336 in Kesh, near Samarkand in Transoxiana (corresponding roughly to modern Uzbekistan). The name “Tamerlane” comes from the Greek-Latin version of Timur’s Persian address as “Timur Lenk’, meaning “Timur the lame”. Timur was a member of the Mongol Barlas tribe (or Barulas) which had been Turkified after settling in Transoxiana in the 13th century AD, following Chagatai (the son of Genghis Khan) in Central Asia. The Barlas with their headquarters at Kesh, had always been allied to Chagatai and his Chagataid successors. During the distribution of the sub-khanates of the Mongol Empire (the Great Khanate) among the Genghisids, namely the descendants of Genghis Khan, Chagatai became the Khagan (Khan) of the Mongol Khanate in Central Asia. The Khanate of Chagatai soon became a Moslem state. Its rulers and their Turco-Mongol followers and fighting men (and ancestors of Timur) embraced Islam in order to tie in religion with the populace of their khanate.

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THE BATTLE OF ΤΗΕ KALKA RIVER (PART ΙI), Russia faces the Mongol threat

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Kalka-River

The  torture  of  the  Kievan  princes  after  their  capture  in  the  battle  of  the  river  Kalka,  in  a  modern artwork.

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By  Periklis    Deligiannis

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CONTINUED  FROM  PART  I

The  main  dispute  between  the  Russian  princes  concerned  their  doubt  if  they  should  cross  to  the  left  bank  of  the  Dnieper,  and  then  march  in  the  open  steppe.  Many  believed  that  they  should  not  do  it,  in  order  not  to  give  battle  in  an  excellent  battlefield  for  the  Mongol  cavalry.  Although  the  opposite  point  of  view  prevailed,  the  aforementioned  estimation  proved  to  be  the  right  one.  Indeed,  Subotai  and  Djebe  intended  to  lure  the  Russo-Cuman  army  deep  into  the  steppe,  surround  it  there  and  destroy  their  enemies.  When  the  allies  had  marched  enough  into  the  steppe,  into  the  land  of  the  Cumans/Kipchaks,  the  Mongols  began  to  wear  their  army  with  sudden  deadly  attacks  of  small  detachments.
On  31  May  1223,  the  allied  army  arrived  in  the  area  of  the  river  Kalka,  whose  site  is  still  unknown.  However  it  is  strongly  believed  to  be  the  modern  small  river  Kalchik  in  eastern  Ukraine,  pouring  into  the  Sea  of  Azov.  The  Mongols  were  now  very  close  and  the  Russians  clashed  with  their  vanguard,  which  they  repulsed.  After  this  first  success,  the  allied  princes  heot success, the alliesld  consultations  in  a  war  council  about  whether  they  had  to  march  further  or  stay  there  and  prepare  for  defense.  It  was  the  most  turbulent  council,  with  intense  disagreements  and  conflicts.  Eventually  the  princes  did  not  agree.  The  aggressive  Mstislav  of  Galicia  crossed  the  Kalka  River  with  his  army,  along  with  his  tributary  Danilo  of  Volynia,  determined  to  go  alone  on  the  march.  Soon  they  were  followed  by  Mstislav  Sviatoslavovich  with  the  army  of  Chernigov  and  Smolensk.  The  Cuman/Kipchak  horsemen  were  marching  in  front  of  the  Galician-Volynian  troops.  The  Cumans  who  also  insisted  on  the  march,  wanting  to  rid  their  homeland  of  the  Mongol  invaders,  were  the  vanguard  of  the  allied  army.  Kalka  river  was  in  the  Cuman  territory.
However  the  allied  forces  were  broken  up,  because  the  numerous  army  of  Kiev  was  left  behind  after  his  own  prince  Mstislav  had  refused  to  follow  the  march.  But  also  between  the  marching  allied  armies,  large  gaps  were  turn  up.  This  was  the  opportunity  that  Subotai  awaited  so  patiently  for.  He  immediately  ordered  the  attack  of  his  murderous  nomad  riders,  who  until  then  were  retreating  purportedly  to  lure  the  allies  into  their  trap.

 battle kalka

Map  of  the  battle  of  Kalka  river.
Legend:  gray  color:  Mongols.  Red  color:  Allies:  1  =  Kievans,  2  =  Chernigovians  &  Smolenskians,  3  =  Volynians  &  Galicians,  4  =  Kipchaks/Cumans.
Subotai  Bahadur  commanded  the  right  Mongolian  wing  of  envelopment  and  Djebe  Noyon  commanded  the  left  one
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THE BATTLE OF KALKA RIVER (PART I), Russia faces the Mongol threat

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Kalka River

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By  Periklis    Deligiannis

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In 1222  the  Mongols  began to threaten dangerously the tribal confederation (Khanate) of the Kipchaks, in the eastern borders of the latter. The Kipchak khanate covered a huge area of Eurasian steppes from the modern southern Ukraine to the Aral Sea in Central Asia. The confederation of the Kipchaks (known also as the Cumans to the Byzantines and as the Polovtsy to the Russians) consisted of Turkish, Finno-Ugric and some Mongolian and Northern Iranian tribes. It seems that the Turkish language had prevailed also in most of the non-Turkish tribes. According to the most probable theory, the khanate of the Cumans/Kipchaks came from the union of two older tribal federations, those of the Kipchaks and the Cumans, hence the double name.
The Russian territory extended to the northwest of the Cumans , and during this period was politically split into independent principalities. The relations between the Russians and the Cumans were usually, if not generally, hostile, but the Mongolian threat forced them to reconcile. Russians and Kipchaks used to unleash devastating raids on each other’s territories.
At the beginning of 1223, the Mongolian threat forced the khan (khagan) of the Western Cumans to seek the help of Mstislav, prince of the Russian principality of Galicia. Mstislav the Brave as he was called, was a hero whose reputation exceeded the Russian borders. Mstislav had realized the lethal threat of a Mongolian invasion in the Russian territories, and immediately called all his Russian counterparts in council in Kiev, with the presence of the Cuman rulers. In Kiev, the metropolis of medieval Russia, they described to the Russian princes the martial prowess and ferocity of the Mongols. In the end, the princes decided on a joint campaign against the invaders.

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