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ON THE HELMET TYPES OF THE LATE ROMAN CAVALRY

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By Periklis Deligiannis

with draco(Fectio)
A Draconarius of the Late Roman period with a Persian-origin type of helmet, in a restoration by the British Historical Association Comitatus (Draco made by the German artisan Stefan Jaroschinski). He is a standard-bearer, bearing the Sarmatian standard of the Dragon, adopted by the Romans as well.
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During the Late Imperial period, the cavalry gradually became the main Weapon of the Roman army supplanting the legions, the glory of Rome. This development was due to the influence of the Iranian peoples (Sarmatians and Persians) and especially to the Roman need to confront the enemies who had a strong cavalry which could defeat the legions (Sarmatians, Sassanids, Goths, Huns). The Roman cavalry helmets of the period belonged to the following four major groups.

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LATE GALLO-ROMAN

classic

The classic Gallo-Roman type of a Middle Empire legionnaire (www.romancoins.info)
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ITALO-CORINTHIAΝ AND OSCO-ATTIC HELMETS: The Evolution of the Greek Helmets in ITALY (8th-1st cent.BC)

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By Periklis  Deligiannis

South_Italy An  Osco-Attic  helmet  of  the  Lucanians  with  many  characteristic  Oscan  novelties.

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Etruscan  hoplites  of  Tarquinia  with  Greek  arms  and  armour,  4th  century  BC.  The  hoplite  on  the  right  wears  a  proper  Attic  helmet.  The  left  one  wears  a  mixed  Phrygo-Attic  helmet.

The  peoples  of  ancient  Italy,  firstly  the  Etruscans  and  the  Iapyges  (later  known  as  ‘Apulians’),  used  almost  all  types  of  the  Archaic,  Classical  and  Hellenistic  Greek  helmets:  the  Corinthian,  the  Chalkidean,  the  Attic (Athenian),  the  Boeotian  (for  the  cavalry)  and  later  the  Thracian,  the  Phrygian  and  all  the  Hellenistic  types.  They  had  particular  preference  for  the  first  three  types.  In  this  article, I  will  deal  specifically  with  two  types  of  helmets  in  Italy  which  originated  from  the  evolution  of  the  original  Greek  respective  ones:  the  Italo-Corinthian  and  the  Italo-Attic  or  Osco-Attic  helmet  (in  fact,  the  Osco-Attic  is  the  main  variety  of  the  Italo-Attic  group  of  helmets).
The  Italo-Corinthian  helmet  (also  known  as  Pseudo-Corinthian,  Apulo-Corinthian  or  Etrusco-Corinthian  )  was  born  out  of  the  habit  of  the  warriors  of  Italy  to  wear  their  Corinthian  helmet  raised,  even  when  the  battle  began.  Because  of  this,  the  protective  visor  gradually  evolved  into  a  decorative  ‘pseudo-visor’  while  the  helmet  was  manufactured  in  a  manner  that  did  not  cover  the  face  anymore.  In  the  later  centuries,  Attic-type  cheek-protectors  were  added  in  it.

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THE UNKNOWN HISTORY OF THE ATTIC/ATHENIAN HELMET

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By  Periklis    Deligiannis
The  standard  type of  Attic/Athenian  helmet  of  the  Roman  officers.

The  Attic  or  Athenian  helmet  was  an  invention  of  the  ancient  Athenians,  derived  from  a  transformation  of  the  older  Chalkidean  casque  (or  Chalkidian).  The  History  of  the  Attic  helmet  spans  to  more  than  a  thousand  years  and  belongs  paradoxically,  more  to  the  Italian-Roman  rather  than  the  Greek  arsenal.
The  ancestral  Chalkidean  helmet  (6th  century  BC)  was  a  “lighter”  type  of  the  even  older  and  famous  Corinthian  or  Dorian  helmet (the  typical  helmet  of  the  Classical  Spartans).  The  Chalkidean  helmet  came  from  the  attempt  of  the  Chalkideans  to  solve  the  problem  of  the  limited  vision  and  hearing  of  the  hoplite,  because  of   his  Corinthian  helmet.  The  Chalkideans  were  the  people  of  the  city-state   Chalkis  in  the  island  Euboea, famous  for  its  weaponry  during  the  Archaic  Era (7th cent. – 479  BC).  It  seems  that  the  Chalkidean  helmet  was  popular  in  Athens  and  Attica,  as  we  can  see  in the  Athenian  vase-paintings.  This  preference  might  be  due  partly  to  the  Ionic  ethnological  affinities  of  the  Athenians  and  Euboeans.
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