By  Periklis    DeligiannisMycen weapons

A  museum  collection  of  Mycenaean  bronze  weapons.  It  includes  swords  (in  Linear  B:  qi-si-poξίφος),  some  of  them  called  ‘phasgana’  (pa-ka-na,  φάσγανα),  daggers,  spearheads,  arrowheads  etc. 

.

The  archaeological  evidence  and  the  descriptions  of  the  Homeric  Epics  (ignoring  the  symbolic  divine  interventions  and  some  obvious  Later  Geometric  elements)  are  the  main  sources  regarding  the  Mycenaean  warfare.  In  the  Greco-Roman  world,  the  Homeric  epics  were  considered  fundamental  writings  on  the  study  of  the  art  of  war.  Especially  the  Mycenaean/Achaean  palatial  tablets  from  Pylos,  Knossos  and  Mycenae,  provide  valuable  information  about  the  military  hierarchy,  organization  and  equipment.  These  tablets  contain  public  records  compiled  by  the  bureaucrats  of  each  palace,  and  reveal  that  the  military  organization  and  the  maintenance  of  the  heavier  military  equipment  were  controlled  by  the  state.  The  Mycenaean/Achaean  nobles  were  obliged  to  provide  military  equipment  and  services.  The  tablets  on  military  issues  were  titled  as  “orchha”  (in  Linear  B  script:  o-ka,  ορχα)  –  a  word  related  to  the  ”orchos”  (όρχος,  military  group)  –  which  probably  means  the  military  unit  and/or    command.

dendra

1234

Two  modern  representation  of  Mycenaean  armored  warriors.  

The  warrior above   wears  the  renowned  segmented  suit  of  armour  of  Dendra,  which  was  used  by  the  warriors  of  the  chariots.  He  bears  the  same  tusk-boar  helmet  with  an  inverted  crest,  and  the  same  lance  ‘enchos’  (Linear  II:  e-ke-  a,  έγχεα)    holding  it  in  a  ‘low  handle’  way.  His  greaves  are  based  on  Mycenaean  finds  from  the  Peloponnesian  Achaea.

The  warrior  below wears  a  relatively  rare  type  of  Mycenaean  armor  (Linear  II:  to-ra-ke,  θώρακεςarmor),  the  scale  armor.  He  attacks  with  an  ‘enchos’  (έγχος),  the  characteristic  Mycenaean  elongated  and  robust  spear/lance,  holding  it  in  a  ‘high  handle’  way.  Note  his  tusk-boar  helmet  (Linear  B:  ko-ru,  κόρυς),  which  is  restored  with  a  rare  item:  the  double  crest  which  is  based  on  relevant  Mycenaean  representations  (reenactment  by  the  Australian  Historical  Association  Sydney  Ancients). Continue reading

Advertisements