Celts
The  Late  Cimbri  and  Teutones  who  confronted  the  Romans,  consisted  largely  of  Celts,  probably  in  the  most  part  according  to  many  historians. Their  appearance  was  frightening  for  the  peoples  of  the  Mediterranean,  as  it  is  analyzed  in  the  Greco-Roman  sources,  and  undoubtedly  many  if  not  almost  all  of  them,  bore  the  typical  Celtic  tattoo,  like  the  Celt  in  the  photograph  (an  accurate  reenactment  of  Celtic  warriors,  Silurian  in  this  case, by  a   Welsh  historic  society. Note specifically Taranis’  wheel tattooed on the forhead of the warrior) 
.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.

CONTINUED FROM PART I

.
The  Romans  appealed  to  general  Gaius  Marius who  was meant  to  be  the  greatest  reformer  of  the  Roman  army.  Marius,  just  25  years old,  radically  reorganized  the  Roman  army. He  turned  the  Roman  legionnaire  from  a  half-armored  citizen-warrior  of  limited  military  service  to  a  fully  armored  and  professional  soldier  of  permanent  service,  aided  by  strong  allied  troops  (auxilia, socii) of  the  subjugated  peoples.  He  trained  his  legionnaires  with  his  own  methods,  creating  in  two  years  a  well-organized  and  disciplined  army.  Meanwhile  the  Cimbri-Teutones  invaded  Spain  and  Gaul,  marching  in  the  territories  of  tribes  who  were  not  their  allies,  probably  trying  to make  them  their  allies  by  force.  They  were  repulsed  by  the Celtiberians  in  Spain  and  by  the  Belgians  in  Gaul.  Their  Celtic  kinsmen  knew (unlike  the  Romans)  very  well  how  to  deal  with  them.  Ultimately  the  Cimbri-Teutones  decided  to  invade  Italy  but  they  divided  their  forces,  possibly  due  to  disagreement  between  their  leaders  or  in  order  to  cause  confusion  to  the  Roman  military  leadership  and  divide  the  Roman  army.  The  allied  tribes  were  also  devided  between  the  two  major  tribal  unions.  For  example,  the  Tigurini  joined  the  Cimbri  and  the  Ambrones  joined  the  Teutones.  In  my  opinion,  this  ‘strange’  equality  of  military  forces  among  the  two  major  tribal  unions,  denotes  that  the  bisection  of  the  barbarian  forces  took  place  after  an  agreement  among  their  warlords.

 In  102  BC  the  Cimbri  and  the  Tigurini  tried  to  cross  the  Alps  from  the  Brenner  Pass,  but  the  consul  Catulus  managed  to  repulse  them  using  maneuvers.  The  second  consul  in  that  year  was  Gaius  Marius  who  assumed  office  for  the  fourth  consecutive  time.  Marius  marched  against  the  Teutones  and  Ambrones  who  were  following  the  coastal  road  from  Narbonesia  to  Italy. Marius’ army  managed  to  repel  them  in  the  coast.  The  Northerners  turned  to  the  passes  of  the  Alps,  but  Marius’  army  running  a  real  speed  race,  caught  up  on  them  in  Aquae  Sextiae.  The  Ambrones  Celts,  the  best  warriors  of  the  Teutonic  horde,  immediately  attacked  the  Roman  defensive  fortifications (earthworks  etc),  but  they  were  decimated.  In  the  next  day  the  Teutones  arrayed  for  battle  and  Marius  responded  to  the  “invitation”.  The  Roman  army  attacked  under  Marius’  order  for  “no  prisoners”.  The  Teutones  were  butchered  so  extensively  that  the  valley  of  Aquae  Sextiae  was  producing  for  many  years  to  come,  huge  quantities  of  cereals  because  of  the  enrichment  of  its  soil  by  the  abundant  blood  of  the  dead  (102  BC).  But  this  information  given  by  the  Greco-Roman  writers,  sounds  like  a  Roman  patriotic  invention. In  any  case,  a  few  Teuton  survivors  found  refuge  in  the  territory  of  the  Sequani  Gauls.  When  the  Romans  demanded  the  surrender  of  the  survivors,  the  terrified  Sequani  obeyed.  The  Romans  killed  the  survivors  on  the  spot,  including  women  and  children.

spears

Spearheads,  javelinheads  and  arrowheads, made of  metal  and  animal  bones  by the  peoples  of  northern  Europe.

.
In  the  meantime,  the  Cimbri  managed  to  cross  the  Alps  due  to  the  refusal  of  Catulus’  legionnaires  to  confront  them. It  seems  that  Catulus  was  not  so  able  in  matters  of  discipline.  Marius  left  over  his  Triumph  due  to  the  great  danger,  and  marched  to  meet  Catulus’  army  who  had  retreated  south  of  the  Po.  The  two  Roman  armies  joined  together,  crossed  the  river  and  met  the  Cimbri  near  Vercellae  (101  BC).  The  Cimbrian  warlord  proceeded  on  horseback,  calling  Marius  to  a  duel  to  death (singularis  pugna),  a  typical  Celtic  custom.  The  answer  he  received  was  that  this  was  not  a  Roman  custom.  After  that,  the  Cimbrian  infantry  attacked  in  a  tactical  formation  of  a  vast  square,  supported  by  the  15,000  Cimbrian  cavalrymen.  The  Northerners  were  determined  to  avenge  the  extermination  of  the  Teutones.  The  first  ranks  of  their  warriors  had  been  tied  together  with  a  heavy  chain  tied  on  their  belts,  in  order  not  to  retreat in  any  case.  The  Cimbri  had  the  sun  in  front  of  them  and  the  day  was  very  warm,  a  weather  condition  which  has  always  affected  negatively  the  Celts  and  Germans,  unlike  the  Mediterranean  Italian  legionaries.  The  new  model  Roman  army  withstood  the  pounding  of  the  Cimbrian  attacks  and  when  they  faded,  Marius  ordered  the  counterattack  of  his  legionnaires.  The  ranks  of  the  Cimbri  fell  apart  and  most  of  them  were  killed.  Some  barbarians  managed  to  reach  their  wagons  in  the  rear,  where  their  wives  awaited  in  anxiety.  The  women  killed  several  of  their  men  and  then  committed  suicide.  This  is  also  a  typical  Celtic  custom:  the  killing  of  the  loved  ones  and  then  the  suicide,  in  order  not  to  be  enslaved  by  the  enemy.  The  readers  may  remember  the  famous  statue  complex  of  the  Attalid  School  of  Pergamon;  the  Celt  who  commits  suicide  after  killing  his  wife.

CimbriTeutones
The  Teutonic  migration  in  a  classic  European  artwork  of  the  19th  century.  Note  the  wagons.
.
The  Romans  captured  60,000  prisoners  and  the  dead  barbarians  numbered  120,000,  although  these  figures  are  clearly  inflated  in  order  to  overemphasize  the  Roman  victory.  In  any  case,  the  Cimbri  were  exterminated  except  the  Tigurini,  who  managed  to  flee  and  settle  in  the  land  of  the  Helvetii (modern  Switzerland)  where  they  entered  their  tribal  union.  That  was  the  end  of  the  epic  migrations  of  the  Cimbri  and  Teutones.  About  a  century  later,  a  Roman  mission  met  at  Jutland  the  few  Cimbri  who  did  not  follow  their  compatriots  in  the  Mediterranean  South.
.
Periklis  Deligiannis

.