In  memory  of  PETER  CONNOLLY  (1935-2012),  one  of  the  foremost  modern  scholars,  archaeologists  and  illustrators  of  the  ancient  world.

.

Alexander  and  his  Companions  are  crossing  the  river  Granicus.  The  greatest  adventure  of  World  History  is  just  beginning (artwork  by  Peter  Connolly).

.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.

The  main  problem  of  the  Persian  army  at  the  Battle  of  Granicus  against  Alexander  the  Great  (334  BC),  was  its  polycentric  leadership.  The  Persian  leadership  consisted  of  five  Iranian  satraps,  a  Rhodian  Greek  mercenary  officer  called  Memnon,  and  several  other  generals  and  commanders.  It  seems  that  Arsites,  the  satrap  of  Hellespontic  Phrygia,  was  the  official  general  commander,  but  the  other  Iranian  satraps  and  generals  were  generally  unruly  and  disobedient,  and  not  influenced  by  his  office. Memnon  was  probably  the  ablest  general  in  the  Persian  headquarters,  as  it  is  evidenced  by  Darius’ (the  Persian  Great  King/Emperor)  appreciation  for  him.  Moreover  he  had  lived  for  a  decade  in  Macedonia  and  probably  knew  all  about  the  Macedonian  Greek  army,  while  he  had  confronted  the  Macedonians  for  two  years  (337-335 BC)  as  a  general,  fighting  the  first  invading  army  of  Parmenio  and  Kalas  in  Asia  Minor.  Memnon  was  certainly  a  very  capable  commander,  but  his  commanding  ability  and  the  value  of  his  proposal  to  the  Persian  council  of  war  in  Zeleia  (see  below)  have  been  probably  exaggerated  by  some  ancient  Greek  authors  (Arrian,  Diodorus  etc.)  who  preferred  their  mercenary  fellow-countryman  as  a  protagonist  in  the  Persian  war  effort,  than  the  Iranian  commanders.  But  despite  Memnon’s  strategic  ability,  Darius  could  not  appoint  him  high  commander  of  the  Persian  amry  against  Alexander,  because  he  was  not  Persian  or  Median.  The  proud  and  rebellious  satraps  and  “relatives  of  the  Great  King”  (a  honorific  title  of  the  most  powerful  Iranian  nobles)  would  never  obey  a  “barbarian”  (from  the  Iranian  point  of  view).

The  decision  to  line  the  Persian  army  for  battle, on  the  banks  of  the  river  Granicus,  in  order  to  beat  off  Alexander  the  Great  in  a  decisive  battle,  was  taken  by  the  satraps-generals  in  a  war  council  in  the  city  of   Zeleia  of   Hellespontic  Phrygia.  During  the  council,  Memnon  warned  the  satraps  that  they  should  not  risk  a  battle  with  the  enemy  because  of  the  Macedonian  superiority  in  infantry,  meaning  not  necessarily  the  numerical  superiority  (Alexander’s  32,000  Macedonian-Greek  infantrymen  against  the  20,000  Greek  mercenaries  of  the  Persians)  but  probably  the  tactical  superiority  of  the  Macedonian  phalanx  of  “sarissophoroi” (pikemen).  A  Persian  defeat  in  an  open  battle  would   judge  the  war.  The  Rhodian  general  noted  that  if  the  Persians  would  defeat  Alexander  in  battle,  he  would  not  lose  anything  because  he  was  in  enemy  territory,  but  if  he  was  the  winner,  then  the  Persian  defeat  would  mean  the  loss  of  the  whole  of  Asia  Minor.  Memnon  also  noted  that  the  Macedonians  would  be  led  by  their  king  (Alexander),  while  the  Persian  king  was  absent,  probably  noting  indirectly  the  problem  of  lack  of  a  robust  Persian  high  command. Memnon’s  strategic  proposal  was  the  following.  The  Persian  army  would  have  to  retreat  before  Alexander’s  march,  turning  inland  and  destroying  farms,  grains,  villages  and  even  cities,  so  that  Alexander  could  not  feed  his  army.  With  this  tactic  of  “scorched  earth”,  the  Macedonian  army  would  get  hungry  and  exhausted,  and  finally  it  would  be  eliminated  by  the  Persian  counterattack. Memnon’s  plan  has  caused  an  endless  debate  between  modern  military  and  other  researchers.  Many  think  that  it  was  an  appropriate  tactic,  others  argue  that  it  was  impractical  and  others  believe  that  even  if  it  was  carried  out,  it  would  be  unsuccessful.  In  my  opinion,  the  latter  are  rather  wrong.  The  tactics  of  “scorched  earth”  brought  about  very  often  if  not  usually,  the  defeat  of  the  attacker.  In  the  modern  era,  this   was  epitomized  mainly  in  the  decimation  of  the  Grand  Army  of  Napoleon  Bonaparte,  when  the  Russian  general  Kutuzov  lured  him  to  Moscow.  Alexander  invaded  Asia  Minor  in  the  spring,  i.e.  the  time  when  agricultural  stocks  are  reduced  and  while  awaiting  the  new  harvest.  The  grains  are  not  developed  sufficiently  until  April  in  the  Mediterranean  countries.  Thus  if  the  Persians  destroyed  all  the  grains  and  the  other  agricultural  stocks  of  Southern  Troad  and  Hellespontic  Phrygia,  Alexander  would  rather  face  serious  supply  problems.

Troas  and  Phrygia (Hellespontic)  in  northwestern  Asia  Minor.

.

The  Battle  of  Granicus  (334  BC).

.

In  theory,  Memnon’s  plan  would  have  succeeded  because  Alexander’s  communications  would  be  dangerously  extended  when  he  would  have  to  march  in  Asia  Minor  mainland,  and  his  army  could  not  be  supplied  from  the  Macedonian/Greek  fleet.  But  Memnon’s  plan  was  not  realistic,  not  because  of  its  possible  outcome (probably  successful),  but  for  the  following  reasons.

1)  the  Rhodian  commander  could  not  see  that  the  Persian  satraps  would  never  accept  it,  because  their  annual  income  came  from  the  grains  and  the  trade  and  other  activities  of  the  residents  of  these  areas.

2) the  areas  proposed  to  be  destroyed,  were  inhabited  by  peoples  subjugated  to  the  Persians,  who  obviously  were  not  friendly  to  them.  If  the  Persian  army  burned  their  belongings,  they  would  revolt  and  join  Alexander  the  Great.  The  inhabitants  of  Troad  and  Phrygia  were  not  Persians  and  Medes  who  were  giving  a  patriotic  defensive  fight  against  Alexander,  as  it  happened  later  in  Persia  and  Sogdiana,  but  subjects  of  Persia  who  would  not  hesitate  to  join  Alexander,  as  it  had  happened  on  several  occasions  during  his  magnificent  campaign.

3) the  official  quest  of  a  Persian/Median  satrap  was  to  protect  the  territory  that  the  Great  King  had  entrusted  to  him.  If  the  land  was  destroyed  with  the  consent  of  the  satrap,  he  would  possibly  be  accused  of  treason  by  the  king.  Furthermore,  the  honor  of  an  Iranian  satrap  or  aristocrat  was  identified  with  the  protection  of  his  lands.

4) Memnon  suggested  essentially  the  destruction  of  the agricultural  stocks  of  Hellespontic  Phrygia  and  probably  southern  Troad,  areas  with  a  numerous  population.  But  if  this  had  happened,  a  major  refugee  problem  would  arise. The  Persians  would  have  to  withdraw  the  Phrygian  and  Troadite  refugees  in  Central  Asia  Minor  Mainland  caring  for  feeding,  protection  and  medical  care,  something  extremely  difficult  if  not  impossible.

A  Macedonian  helmet  of  the  Thraco-Phrygian  type

.

Somehow  Memnon  insulted  the  Persian  generals  by  advising  them  bluntly  to  avoid  open  battle  with  Alexander.  Memnon  had  experienced  himself  in  Philip’s  Macedonia  and  in  Asia  Minor,  the  crushing  attack  and  fighting  action  of  the  Macedonian  phalanx.  He  also  knew  that  the  redoubtable  phalanx  of  the  Macedonian  Greeks  overwhelmed  all  the  opponent  Helladic  hoplite  armies.  However,  despite  the  sincerity  of  the  Rhodian  commander,  in  societies  with  warlike  origins  such  as  the  Iranian  nobility  (Aryans),  this  kind  of  advice  is  perceived  as  addressed  to  cowards.  It  seems  that  Memnon  ignored  generally  the  Iranian  code  of  honor . Those  who  believe  that  the  plan  of  the  Rhodian  commander  was  futile,  note  the  fact  that  he  did  not  implement  it  later,  when  Darius  appointed  him  general  commander  of  the  Persian  defense  of  Asia  Minor,  supposedly  because  Memnon  actually  did  not  considered  his  own  plan  effective.  But  these  scholars  forget  that  when  Memnon  became  high  commander,  Alexander  had  already  annexed  Hellespontic  Phrygia,  Troas,  Aeolis,  Ionia  and  Lydia,  i.e.  the  wealthier  regions  of  Asia  Minor,  from  which  he  had  ensured  sufficient  supplies  for  the  relatively  small  Macedonian  army.  Thus,  the  tactic  of  “scorched  earth”  against  Alexander  would  have  no  further  effect. The  Persian  satraps  rejected  out  of  hand  the  plan  of  the  Rhodian  general.  The  local  satrap  Arsites  stated  clearly  that  he  would  not  accept  even  the  burning  of  a  single  dwelling  house.  The  decision  of  the  war  council  was  to  line  up  the  Persian  army  on  the  eastern  bank  of  the  river  Granicus,  where  the  Iranian  generals  felt  that  the  Macedonian  army  would  fragment  while  trying  to  cross  it.  So  the  Macedonians  would  be  vulnerable  to  the  Persian  attack  and  would  be  crashed.  But  their  estimates  were  wrong,  as  it  turned  out  to  be  very  soon,  because  of  the  tactical  genius  of  Alexander  ….

.

Periklis   Deligiannis

.