d

Reconstruction  of  two xiphos long types, that is of the early Archaic era. Later, in the Classical era, their length was reduced due to the development of hoplite warfare  (credit: Hoplite Association).

.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.

The  Greek  hoplite  sword (xiphos, ξίφος) was  double-edged.  The  blade  was  wider  in  the  middle  of  its  length  so  that  the  weight  was  concentrated  to  this  point,  making  the  stroke  to  the  enemy  even  overwhelming.  The  Greek  sword  was  used  equally  for  perforation  of  the  enemy.
The  sword  was  an  auxiliary  weapon  for  the  Greek  hoplites,  who  usually  used  it  when  they  broke  their  spear  during  the  fight,  or  when  they  could  not  use  the  later  due  to  the  limited  space.  However  they  were  not  lacking  in  sword  fight,  compared  with  spear  fight.  Several  modern  scholars  often  suggest  that  the  Roman  legionaries  were  better  swordsmen  compared  to  the  warriors  of  other  peoples  who  were  not  fond  of  the  use  of  the  sword,  among  whom  were  the  ancient  Greeks.  However,  it  should  be  noted  that  the  Romans  used  the  heavy  gladius sword  (gladius  italiensis,  and  later  the  much  more  effective  gladius  hispaniensis but both of them of Spanish origins) which  did  not  need  great  skill  to  use.  The  Romans  used  its  weight  and  shape,  which  allowed  the  full  exploitation  of  its  weight  to  achieve  a  crushing  stroke  to  their  opponent,  nullifying his  shield  if  it  was  not  metal  (after  all,  the  shields  of  the  enemies  of  Rome  were  usually  wooden).  In  contrast,  the  Greek  swords  were  relatively  light,  with  the  exceptions  of  the  kopis (known  as  “falcata” or  “falx” in  the  western  Mediterranean), the machaira and  a  few  other  types.  This  data  demonstrates  that  the  Greek  hoplites  used  a  special  technique  of  sword  fight,  to  injure  or  kill  their  enemy  opponent.  Moreover,  this  opponent  was  usually  another  Greek  hoplite  and  there  was  no  sword  that  could  crush  his  heavy  bronze  hoplite  shield  with  powerful  but  clumsy  sword  blows.  Additionally,  the  Greek  hoplite  was  very  well  armored  (protected)  with  a  strong  helmet  and  a  cuirass  of  various  types.  The  only  way  that  a  hoplite  could  strike  the  flesh  of  an  enemy  hoplite  with  his  sword,  was  the  development  of  his  skill  in  fencing.  In  conclusion,  the  Romans  simply  preferred  the  sword  more  than  the  Greeks,  without  being  better  swordsmen  than  them.

Greek sword

The proper type of the Classical hoplite xiphos and its scabbard (Reconstruction of a Xiphos by Manning Imperial, Wikimedia commons, user: Phokion)

kopisA  Greek  kopis  sword (from  excavations) known  as  “Falcata” in  the  western  Mediterranean

.

The  Spartan  hoplites  used  the  classic  Greek  hoplite  sword  with  a  blade  type  of  iron.  During  the  5th  century  BC,  they  were  continually  reducing  the  length  of  its  blade,  evolving  it  to  the  end  of  the  century,  into  a  purely  Spartan  type  of  sword.  The  explanation  lies  in  Spartan  warfare.  During  the  battle,  the  Spartan  hoplite  was  trying  to  come  closer  to  his  opponent  for  a  very  close  duel (a  Spartan  was  almost  unbeatable  in  that  type  of  fight).  In  the  narrow  space  of  the  hoplite  phalanx,  a  sword  with  strong  perforation  power,  which  also  would  approximate  the  length  of  a  dagger,  was  the  “perfect”  weapon.  The  Athenian   reliefs   confirm  the  reports  of  ancient  authors  considering  the  Spartan  short  sword.  They  often  depict  Spartans  carrying  a  short  sword  with  a  maximum  length  of  30  cm,  and  also  leaf-shaped  (much  like  a  spearhead).  The  only  example  of  this  type  of  sword  was  found  in  excavations  in  Crete  and  was  originally  part  of  a  statue.

The  short  length  of  the  Spartan  sword  has  led  some  scholars  to  conclude  that  it  was  also  used  for  strokes  from  bottom to  top.  This  is  confirmed  by  some  depictions  of  injured  or  fallen  on  the  ground  Spartans,  who  hold  this  sword  and  aim  upwards  toward  the  abdominal  or  groin  of  their  standing  opponents.  Soon  the  short  sword  spread  in  most  Greek  regions  displacing  older  types.
The  xyele  is  another  Spartan  type  of  sword  mentioned  in  ancient  sources.  It  has  been  considered  as  a  type  of  knife  or  dagger (most  likely).  Because  of  its  way  of  usage,  it  seems  very  likely  to  have  been  sickle-shaped.  If  so,  then  the  Xyele  belonged  to  the  group  of  sickle-swords  and  sickle-daggers  (kopis,  romphaea,  falcata,  falx  and other),  used  by  various  peoples  of  the  Mediterranean.

A  Spartan  short  xiphos (from  excavations). During most of the Classic Period, the  short  xiphos was  the  standart  hoplite  sword.

.

The  Athenian  hoplites  were  also  using  the  standard  hoplite  sword,  but  it  looks  like  some  of  them  preferred  the  Kopis,  though  this  type  of  long  sickle-sword  was  suitable  mostly  for  cavalry,  because  its  use  required  open  space.  The  Kopis  was  a  robust  singly-cut  saber.  A  well-balanced  single  stroke  of  a  Kopis  could  cut  the  enemy  warrior’s  hand  or  leg.  The  sickle-shaped  swords  were  used  by  many  Mediterranean  peoples  (Iberians,  Celtiberians,  Greeks,  Thracians,  Etruscans,  Latins,  Lycians,  Carians,  Lydians,  Phrygians,  Dacians  and  others).  The  Kopis  could  not  be  used  effectively  in  the  limited  space  of  an  hoplite  conflict.  But  the  Greek  hoplites  could  use  it  effectively   against  Asian  and  Egyptian  warriors,  because  a  battle  against  them  was  not  of  an  inter-hoplite  type  (among  hoplites).  Usually  a  rapid  brake  to  the  Asian  battle  array,  gave  open  space  to  the  hoplites  in  order  to  kill  their  enemies  quickly  with  deadly  strokes  of  Kopis-type  swords.  Additionally,  the  defensive  armor  of  the  Asians  and  the  Egyptians  was  rudimentary  or  nonexistent.  Generally  speaking,  the  Athenians  and  other  Greek  hoplites  preferred  the  Kopis  more  than  the  Spartans,  but  the  typical  short  sword  was  the  most  common  also  among  them.
Α  few  Athenian  vase-paintings  of  the  6th-5th  centuries  BC  depict  Athenian  hoplites  using  a  kind  of  curved  saber  (type  ‘Cutlass’,  as  it  is  called  nowadays).  This  saber  originated  probably  from  Asia  Minor,  but  its  rare  depiction  demonstrates  that  it  did  not  become  popular  in  Greece.

.

Periklis  Deligiannis

.