aaaaaThe  allied  Greek  fleet  in  the  sea  battle  of  Salamis,  against  the  Phoenicians  and  the  Persians.

.

By  Periklis    Deligiannis

.
The  Navy  of  ancient  Sparta – an  important  Weapon  of  the  Spartan army – remains  in  a  state  of  oblivion  for  most  researchers.  The  Spartans  had  no  naval  tradition,  nor  ever  acquired  one.  But  the  Spartan  navy  was  a  reality,  due  to  the  inhabitants  of  the  coasts  of  Laconia.  Later,  during  the  Classical  era,  the  united  Peloponnesian  Navy  was  provided  mainly  by  the  Peloponnesian  allies  of  Sparta.  After  the  end  of  the  Hegemony  of  Sparta  in  Greece  (371  BC),  the  Spartans  reduced  essentially  their  naval  forces  until  the  time  of  king  Nabis,  who  was  responsible  for  the  last  glimpse  of  the  Spartan  navy.
The  maritime  tradition  of  the  coastal  Laconian  “perioikoi” (subjects  of  Sparta,  mostly  pre-Dorian)  begins  at  least  from  the  Mycenaean  era,  when  the  Lacedaemonian  Achaeans  took  part  in  the  Trojan  War  with  60  ships.  The  founding of  common  colonies  by  Spartan  Dorians  and  Laconian  pre-Dorians  in  Crete,  Melos,  Thera (Santorini)  and  Cnidus  (a  city  of  Asia  Minor),  indicates  that  the  Laconian  maritime  tradition  continued  uninterruptedly  during  the  Geometric  period (11th-8th  centuries  BC).  This  is  also  indicated  by  the  Spartan  naval  operation  for  the  founding  of  Taras  (modern  Taranto)  in  Southern  Italy  (706/5  BC),  which  started  from  Gythion, the  main  port  of  Sparta (Taras  was  a  Spartan  colony). 

The  Spartan  state  possessed  a  territorial  outlet  to  the  sea  from  the  middle  of  the  8th  century,  but  the  colonizing  cooperation  of   Doric  Spartans  and  pre-Dorian  Laconians  during  the  whole  Geometric  period  was  frequent.  The  only  Laconian  Dorians  that  managed  to  acquire  some  seamanship  experience  were  apparently  the  Spartan  settlers  in  Gythion  and  in  the  island  of  Kythira (who  were  reduced  to  the  political  state  of  “perioikoi”, like  the pre-Dorians).
During  the  Greek  Archaic  Period  (700-480  BC),  it  is  certain  that  Sparta  had  a  fleet  of  “pentikonteres” (warships  with  50  oars  in  one  deck),  perhaps  also  some  biremes (warships  with  approximately  120  oars,  arranged  in  two  decks),  provided  by  the  Laconian  coastal  “perioikic”  cities.  In  524  BC,  Sparta  and  Corinth  (Sparta’s  loyal  Dorian  ally)  united  their  fleets  for  a  naval  campaign  against  the  island  of  Samos,  in  order  to  overthrow  Polycrates,  the  mighty  tyrant  of  the  island.  This  campaign  failed  because  of  the  Samian  naval  power.  The  ancient  writer  Eusebius,  in  his  “List  of  Sea  powers”  (in  which  he  lists  the  most  powerful  naval  city-states  of  the  Archaic  Period),  mentions  Sparta  as  the  most  powerful  Greek  naval  city-state  during  the  years  517-515  BC.  This  reference  is  not  true,  because  of  the  existence  of  powerful  contemporary  naval  powers  such  as  Corinth (the  greatest  naval  power  of  the  whole  of  that  Period),  Aegina,  Miletus,  Samos,  Phocaea,  Eretria  etc.,  but  denotes – like  the  naval  campaign  against  Polycrates – that  the  Spartans  had  at  their  disposal  a  relatively  small  but  effective  war  fleet.  The “perioikoi”  who  provided  warships  for  the  Spartan  fleet  were  solely  coastal  Lakonians,  because  the   “perioikoi”  of   neighboring  Messenia (also  subjects  of  Sparta)  no  longer  had  any  naval  tradition,  after  the  exodus  of  the  Pylian  Achaeans  to  Asia  Minor  and  to  the  Greek  colony  of  Metapontion (Metapontum) in  Southern  Italy  (in  1200-600  BC).

troop carrier-in-rain

An  ancient  Greek  troop-carrier  trireme (in  rain).  Note  the  covered  and  extensive  deck  (cataphract) for  the  transportation  of  the  hoplites  and  other  troops  (by  Sam  Manning)

.

The  Spartan  territories  of  Laconia  and  Cynouria  had  several  small  towns-ports  with  advanced  shipping:  on  the  east  Peloponnesian  coast  lied  the  ports (and  ‘perioikic’  towns)  of  Thyrea (modern  Astros),  Tyros,  Prasiai  (modern  Leonidion),  Kyphanta,  Zarax  (modern  Gerakas)  and  Epidauros  Limera.  In  the  Laconian  Gulf  lied  the  ‘perioikic’  towns:  Voiai  (modern  Neapolis),  Las,  Gythion,  Asini  (modern  Scutari  Bay),  while  in  the  Messenian  Gulf  (but  in  Laconian  territory)  lied  the  important  Kardamyle  (in  the  peninsula  of  Tainaron).  The  most  important  harbor  was  always  Gythion.  It  is  considered  that  approximately  the  same  towns  had  provided  the  warships  that  Lacedaemon  (the  Achaean  ancestor-city  of  Dorian  Sparta)  sent  against  Troy  around  1250  BC.  The  dockyards  where  Spartan/Laconian  warships  were  built  (at  least  during  the  Peloponnesian  War),  were  in  Trinassos  (Three  Islands),  near  Gythion.
The  inhabitants  of  the  above  mentioned  coastal  cities  had  a  social  class  of  successful  merchants  and  seamen  with  an  extensive  local  shipbuilding  experience.  These  men  were  undertaken  the  building  and  manning  of  the  Spartan  war  fleet  at  all  times.

SouthernPeloponessusSparta (“Esparta”  in  the  map)  and  its  territory,  with  the  ‘perioikic’ towns  of  Laconia  that  provided  ships  and  seamen  for  the  Spartan  navy.

.
Around  500  BC,  the  Spartan  fleet  of  pentikonteres  was  replaced  by  a  new  fleet  of  triremes,  with  which  Sparta  took  part  in  the  naval  operations  of  the  Persian  Wars.  The  shipbuilding  technology  for  the  construction  of  the  Spartan  triremes  came  from  Corinth  and  Aegina,  great  naval  powers  of  the  time.  Thus  Sparta  established  its  first  fleet  of  triremes  almost  a  decade  earlier  than  Athens  itself.  Until  490  BC  Athens  had  only  pentikonteres  and  perhaps  some  biremes.  The  Athenians  built  their  first  triremes  only  after  the  battle  of  Marathon  (490  BC),  thanks  to  Themistocles’  persistence.  The  Spartan  naval  squadron  of  the  united  Greek  fleet  of  the  Persian  Wars,  was  the  fifth  largest  among  those  of  other  Greek  states,  consisting  of  16  triremes.  It  was  numerically  smaller  only  than  the  squadrons  of  Athens  (200  triremes  with  those  of  the  Athenian  colonists  in  Lelantion  of  Euboea),  Corinth  (40  triremes),  Aegina  (total  40  triremes  with  a  reserve  of  ten  such  warships  that  remained  in  the  island  of  Aegina)  and  Megara  (20 triremes).  The  Spartan  naval  squadron  was  followed  numerically  by  the  squadron  of  Sicyon  with  15  triremes,  and  other  smaller  squadrons.  The  renowned  power  of  the  Spartan  land  army  had  its  impact  on  the  united  Greek  fleet.  The  Spartan  Admiral  was  always  the  Admiral  of  the  united  Greek  navy  of the  Persian  Wars (the  Spartan  Admirals  Euriviades  and  Leotychides).  However,  the  mature-minded  Spartan  admirals  (like  all  the  Spartans)  having  no  maritime  experience  and  recognizing  the  genius  of  Themistocles,  allowed  him  implicitly  to  be  the  effective  commander  of  the  Greek  fleet.

.

Periklis   Deligiannis

.

CONTINUE READING IN  PART  II

.