ersg

The Inca imperial  army on the march (Source unknown – please inform me if you know the copyright owner of this artwork)

.

The  Inca  Empire  was  the  most  extensive  pre-Columbian  state  of  America,  including  the  western  2/3rds  of  the  area  of  modern  Peru,  western  (mountainous)  Bolivia,  most  of  Ecuador,  northern  Chile  and  northwestern  Argentina.  It  comprised  an  area  of  1,000,000  sq.  km.  and  a  population  of  around  6,000,000-20,000,000  around  AD  1520,  according  to  various  modern  estimates.  At  the  same  time,  the  plateau  of  Mexico  had  25,000,000  inhabitants,  of  whom  the  2/3rds  (about  16,000,000)  were  subjects  of  the  Aztecs.  The  Incan  army  numbered  100,000-200,000  warriors  in  normal  conditions  but  in  an  a  state  of  emergency  many  more  could  be  mobilized.  The  Inca  state  is  known  in  western  sources  and  in  modern  historiography  as  the  “Empire  of  the  Incas”,  but  its  inhabitants  called  it  “Tawantinsuyu”,  meaning  the  “Land  of  Four  quarters’.  This  term  meant  the  administrative  division  of  the  state  into  four  districts/regions:  the  “Chinchasuyu”  (North),  the  “Collasuyu”  (South),  the  “Cuntisuyu”  (West)  and    the  “Antisuyu”  (East).  The  Inca  capital  Cuzco,  in  modern  Peru,  was  the  “imperial”  metropolis  of  South  America.  The  Inca  empire  included  over  150  subjugated  tribes  who  spoke  at  least  twenty  different  languages,  which  belonged  to  four  major  ethno-linguistic  families  and  some  lesser.  The  central  region  of  the  state  was  inhabited  by  the  Quechua  peoples (ethno-linguistic  group)  while  the  Aymara  peoples lived  in  the  south of  them.  The  Peruvian  coast  was inhabited  by  the  tribes  of  the  Chimu  Group.  In  the  territories  north  of  the  Quechua  lived  the  almost  primitive  tribes  Uru.  During  the  rule  of  the  Incas,  they  tried  to  impose  their  own  Quechua  language  as  the  universal  language of their  empire  in  order  to  achieve  greater  consistency,  resulting  in  “quechuanizing”    many  subjugated  peoples.  This  is  the  reason  of   the  striking  modern  distribution  of  10,000,000  Quechua-speaking  Indians   from  northern  Ecuador  to  northwestern  Argentina.  The  dispersion  of  the  Aymara  is  also  great.  The  chronology  of  the  reign  of  the  Inca  emperors  before  Pachacuti  Inca  Yupanqui  (1438-1471)  is  highly  questionable  and  practically  impossible  to  restore. 

inca_map
The  proto-Incas  were  a  scant  of  number  Quechua  clan,  descended  from  the  village  Paqari Tampu,  25  Km  south  of  Cuzco.  Paqari  Tampu  was  the  real  cradle  of  the  Incas,  before  they  conquer  Cuzco.  When  they  had  set  up  their  vast  empire,  the  name  “Inca”  defined  only  a  few  thousand  people:  the  royal  family,  the  descendants  of  the  original  Inca  clan  (proto-Incas)  and  some  nobles  of  the  vassal  tribes.  These  vassal  nobles  were  named  “Inca”  by  the  original  Incas,  for  reasons  of  political  expediency.  The  millions  of  the  subject  inhabitants  of  the  empire  were  not  considered  as  “Incas”.  Even  the  common  people  of  Cuzco  were  not  considered  as  Incas,  maintaining  their  tribal  name:  “Quechua”.
The  historical  restoration  of  the  military  history  of  the  Incas  before  the  reign  of  Pachacuti  Yupanqui  is  difficult,  because  the  local  oral  traditions  (which  were  recorded  later)  include  many  mythological  elements.  However,  the  latter  are  traceable  and  the  scholars  had  achieved  a  satisfactory  restoration  of  the  events  of  the  original  Inca  expansion (a  subject  of  an  article  to  be  published  soon  in  this  site).  The  writings  of  the  Spanish  chroniclers  Pedro  de  Cieza  de  León,  Bernardino  de  Sahagún  and  others,  are  important  sources  for  the  historical  tradition  of  the  Incas.

5

An  Inca  golden  mask,  symbolizing  the  sun.  It  was  one  of  the  Inca  imperial  symbols.

.

1y4eBsbA warrior of the Canari people, by Peter Dennis (copyright: Osprey  publishing, Peter Dennis)

.
Nations/tribes  of  the  Inca  imperial  army

The  following  list  includes  the  major  peoples/tribes  of  the  Inca  empire  in  1525,  which  provided  troops  to  the  imperial  army.  The  Canari  and  the  Chachapoya  were  considered  hard  fighters.  The  fighting  methods  and  tactics  differed  considerably  from  tribe  to  tribe,  so  the  individual  tribal  corpses  of  the  imperial  army  were  specialized  in  different  weapons.  For  example,  the  Huanca  were  mostly  slingers,  the  Anti  and  the  Chuncho  were  archers,  the  Canchi  used  poisoned  darts,  etc.  Generally  speaking,  the  majority  of  the  imperial  soldiers  (warriors)  were  mace-bearers  and  spear-bearers.  In  1525  the  military  dresses  of  the  soldiers/warriors  were  more  uniform.  The  individual  tribal  corpses  were  discriminated  by  a  distinctive  symbol  on  the  helmet  of  their  warriors  or  by  the  characteristic  headdress  of  their  tribe.

Adaguaylas

Anti

Bonbon

Cajamarca

Cana

Canari

Carabaya

Canchi

Chachapoya

Chanca

Charca

Chimu

Chincha

Chuncho

Colla

Conchuco

Cunti

Cuzco (native  Quechua  of  Cuzco)

Guaylas

Huacrachucu

Huamachuco

Huanca

Jauja

Lupaca

Lucana

Pacasa

Quechua

Riobamba

.

PERIKLIS  DELIGIANNIS

.

SOURCES-BIBLIOGRAPHY

(1)               De Cieza de Leon, Pedro: THE INCAS, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1959.

(2)               Metraux Alfred: THE HISTORY OF THE INCAS, Pantheon Books, New York, 1969.

(3)               Davies N.: THE ANCIENT KINGDOMS OF PERU, Penguin Books, London 1999.

RELATED:     INCA  WARFARE:  THE  FIRST  PHASE  OF  THE  INCAN  CONQUESTS